Peanut Head: Volume Loss at the Temples

29 Jul

I’d argue the most over looked sign of aging is loss of volume in the temple. As we age, the temples lose fat and begin to narrow, shifting the balance of the face downward. Volume loss here contributes to the appearance of drooping and sagging of the cheeks and eyes (see Structural Changes in the Aging Face for other changes).  It begins as early as in your 20’s. It is most notable in athletes who have very little fat on their bodies, I’ve found especially runners.

As you can see, the area of total volume loss is pretty big when you actually look at it. In order to achieve the youthful contour of the temple, a patient will require a lot of product here. Adding filler to the temple is easy and almost painless, but deciding what filler to use can be difficult, they all have pro’s and con’s.

Juvéderm

This is usually my first choice with patients. For some reason… people tend to be nervous about filling this area! The great thing about Juvéderm is that it’s disolvable. The bad thing about Juvéderm is… you need a lot of it to fill this area, and that can be expensive. I’ve found great results by diluting the product before injection. The patient can see the result immediately. It may not last as long this way, but it is a good starting point. Most people love the result and usually step up to Sculptra when they notice they need a “refill.”


Radiesse

I personally don’t use Radiesse in the temples. It always reminds me of the scene from the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills when Adrienne Malouff’s husband injects Taylor and she has this big bump in her temple and Adrienne goes “is it supposed to look like that?” Although you get more volume with Radiesse, you also have more of a chance for lumps in this area. It’s not as smooth as Juvéderm (which is literally defined as a smooth consistency gel). It’s just not my preference, but for extreme volume lost I can see it being more cost effective.


Sculptra

I personally have had Sculptra injected into my temples. Sculptra is not a filler, but a biostimulator. Over several weeks post injection it promotes collagen production. It may take more than one treatment (usually 1-3 vials 1-3 treatments) to achieve the desired result. This is the longest lasting, and most cost effective product if you consider the longevity, but up front can be expensive. If you are the type of patient who is doing multiple fillers at a time, you should probably step up to Sculptra.


Fat Transfer

Fat injections can also be used in the temples but are only cost effective if a large amount of volume is needed for the entire face. I recommend only allowing a plastic surgeon perform this procedure (although a nurse can do it in Massachusetts). The fat is harvested from another area of the body (usually the lower back) via liposuction and transferred to areas of volume loss in the face (usually not just the temple). There is a lot of swelling and bruising with this treatment and not all the fat will graft (stay alive after transfer). It is also an expensive and invasive procedure. This being said, it can yield great results for patients who really need it.


The Procedure

Numbing cream is applied to the temple. The product selected is mixed with lidocaine and deposited on the bone until achieving desired volume. There is very little pain associated with all injectable products. Bruising isn’t typical; however, there are many vessels in this area, so it can happen. Expected cost depends on the product selected, but expect to use at least 1-2 syringes during time of treatment.

Good luck!

About these ads

One Response to “Peanut Head: Volume Loss at the Temples”

  1. lisa August 1, 2013 at 4:36 pm #

    thank you for this post! I have never understood the benefit of temple injections, and after reading this, I had a much better understanding (and actually added it on to my lip augmentation yesterday and was DELIGHTED with the results). thanks again for your informative blog, much appreciated by the rest of us

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 74 other followers

%d bloggers like this: