Archive | September, 2012

Belotero: The Buzz

18 Sep

I’ve been waiting to announce this for months!

Merz Aesthetics (the company that makes Radiesse) has released a new product: Belotero Balance. The product was FDA approved in November, 2011. My office was involved in clinical trials, so I (of course) got a sneak peak at the product, and have been anxiously awaiting it’s arrival.

Why am I so excited you ask? Well, first, I think Merz makes awesome products (Radiesse is my favorite to use!). Second, and most important, this product can go into vertical lip lines! That’s right. No more “smoker’s lines!” I have SO many clients who complain about “smoker’s lines” around their lips!

Prior to this product’s release, there were two ways to treat the vertical lip line: with Botox or with HA Fillers.

Botox


  • Some people like it, some people don’t. I’ve personally never had Botox injected in my lips (I have however had many, many syringes of Juvéderm), but I’ve been told it is a strange sensation. It feels weird to spit out your tooth paste, or use a straw, or kiss, because the muscle that is used for these things is “relaxed.” Obviously, you don’t want to relax it too much, or you’ll look like a stroke victim, so I’ve found it doesn’t last long in the lips.

Fillers (Juvéderm and Restylane)

  • As you can see from the picture below (this is a great example), by injecting product into the border of the lip (vermillion border), the vertical lip lines do visibly improve, but they are still there.

  • OR, you can have what I like to call “the monkey face effect” (I couldn’t find an excellent picture of this, but I’ve seen some real bad monkey faces. I would have tried to take a picture of this, but I’ve found people don’t respond well when you tell them they look like a monkey face from their filler. Or a cat face.)

Anyways, Back to Belo…

The Hyaluronic Family

Belotero is a hyaluronic acid injectable gel, like Juvéderm and Restylane. Belotero more easily integrates into the skin and adapts to facial contours than other HA’s because it is softer. This results in a more natural and subtle look (but may require more product in some areas). Belo is designed to treat superficial facial lines and moderate to severe wrinkles that are closer to the surface of the skin. Unlike Belo, fillers such as Juvéderm leave a bluish hue under the skin called the Tyndall Effect, when it is injected too superficially, like in vertical lip lines. Injections of Belo last up to 12 months, which is comparable to Juvéderm (Restylane lasts about 6 months—does anyone even use Restylane anymore? Anyone?).

Belotero is made of sugars which naturally occur in our skin. No allergy test is required, and treatment is very safe. Like with all injectables, bruising and swelling are always a possible. My friend Colleen who is a dental hygienist is going to hate me for saying this again, but, for those of you in Boston who don’t tell anyone you do this stuff (even though EVERYONE does it) the best excuse for bruising is a “dental appointment.”

For fine superficial folds/fine lines. Including:

  • Periorbital folds or “crow’s feet” (also referred to as Periorbital lines)
  • Perioral Lines (aka Smoker’s lines)
  • Tear troughs
  • Deep forehead lines

For medium wrinkles, moderate-to-deep folds, lip contouring, and facial contouring. Including:

  • Glabellar crease, or frown line (the line that forms between the eyebrows).
  • Nasolabial folds, or smile lines (from the edge of the nose to the corners of the mouth).
  • Mentolabial crease, or chin folds (horizontal line that forms across the middle of the chin).
  • Marionette lines (from the corners of the mouth to the chin and jawline).
  • Earlobes (which of course aren’t in my picture! Oops!)
  • Lips and philtrum (which is the area between the nose and the upper lip)

(Do you like my feather lashes? I love Halloween Eyelashes!)

The world of Aesthetic Medicine is always changing. New products are being developed as we speak. For the latest info on the best new technology, stay tuned! I’m psyched for my newly approved Sientra Silicone Breast Implants! One more month until surgery!!!!

XOXO, LK

L.A.S.E.R. (Hair Removal)

15 Sep

Light Amplification (by the) Stimulated Emission (of) Radiation

Whenever someone says “laser” it makes me think of that scene from Austin Powers when Dr. Evil wants “sharks with frickin laser beams attached to their heads.” Ha.

Mr. Bigglesworth. HAAAAA. I digress. Anyways, this post isn’t about sharks… it’s about laser. Specifically, about Laser Hair Removal.

I was lucky enough to sit in on a class at Catherine Hinds Institute of Esthetics in Woburn, MA. It was a very informative and interesting class. The teacher was very knowledgeable and interesting. So I’m going to pass on that knowledge to you! Yeah!

First and Foremost…

The most important thing I can tell you about laser hair removal is BE CAREFUL WHERE YOU GO. Laser’s are a class 4 medical device, that, unfortunately, can be used by anyone under current state law (Massachusetts). If you go to a laser factory (i.e. Sleek Medspa, or American Laser Co.) the odds are you are being lasered by someone who has no idea what they are doing. Getting burned is not worth saving $50. I assure you. It’s painful and can leave scarring, and you especially don’t want this on your face.

Next. The second most important thing to ask is “do you have a laser or an IPL?” Many people are offering laser hair removal and it’s actually an IPL (Intense Pulse Light).

What is the difference between IPL and Laser?
A lot.


A Laser is Monochromatic.

Monochromatic: One color, red.

An IPL is Polychromatic.

Polychromatic: Every color in the rainbow. And then some!


A Laser is Collimated.

Collimated: Laser light energy will form a bond and stick together.

Think of a laser pointer.

An IPL is non-Collimated.

The bonds don’t stick together. They kind of spray all over the place. There is no focus to the energy. Think of a flashlight.


A Laser is coherent.

Coherent: The bonds of the laser light all travel together on the same wavelength.


An IPL is non-coherent.

The wavelength of energy is all different and erratic. Some are short and some are long. Some are straight and some are squiggly. It’s chaos I tell you. Chaos.  Yes, I spelled Chaos wrong below.  Shhhh.

What does this mean?!?!?!

A laser is focused energy that is attracted to dark color (hair follicle) and burns and kills the follicle.

An IPL tricks the hair into shock to release the hair follicle, but does not kill it. It will come back! (IPL’s do have a purpose, however, they are great for pigmented lesions! Like hyperpigmentation from the sun).

Pretreatment

  • Do not wear creams or lotions to your appointment.
  • Do not wear deodorant if you’re getting your underarms treated.

Before Your Laser Hair Removal Starts

Before any treatment is started you should fill out a health history. You are NOT a candidate for laser IF:

  • If you have been in the sun in the last two weeks (this INCLUDES a tanning bed). You will get burned by the laser. And don’t even think about lying to the laser tech. You get burned and it’s YOUR fault.
  • You are on photosensitive medications.
  • You have EVER had gold therapy.
  • You have used retinol the night before (on your face, and you’re getting your face lasered).
  • You have Lupus.
  • You are on immunosuppressive drugs.
  • You can’t stay out of the sun. This is IMPERITIVE.
  • Taken Accutane within the last six months.
  • Have an open wound.
  • Are pregnant.

After it has been confirmed that you are a candidate for laser, the tech will choose which laser is the best for your skin. This is based off your skin type.

Alexandrite vs. ND Yag

http://www.alexandrite.net/chapters/chapter7/the-alexandrite-laser.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nd:YAG_laser

Laser’s are named after the gemstone that is used to produce the beam. The two most popular laser’s on the market right now are the Alex and the Yag. What’s the difference?

ALEX

YAG

Multiplex

Gemstone

Alexandrite

NeoDymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet

Alex and ND YAG

Energy Wavelength

755nm

1064nm

Fires both at same time

Skin Types

I, II, III

I, II, III, IV, V, VI (all)

All

Sun Exposure

None

(at least 4 weeks)

No recent exposure

(5-7 days)

None

(at least 4 weeks)

Attracted to

Melanin only

Melanin deeply

Hemoglobin

Collagen

Melanin deeply and superficially (best for Asian skin)

How Laser Hair Removal Works
Laser hair removal treatment works through a process called selective photothermolysis. The laser energy works it’s way down the stem of the hair to the bottom of the follicle, destroying the cell. The process is selective in the hair through pigment and not the skin around it. Very light colored blonde or white hair cannot have a laser treatment because there is not enough pigment for the laser to select from.

In the diagram below the picture is of a laser, not an IPL. The pulsed red light is referring to the type of firing of the laser. In aesthetics, it fires in a pulse.

During the laser hair removal treatment a cooling system is used to cool the s is usually applied to the skin, this prevents the area being treated from getting too hot or burning under the heat of the laser. There are three main cooling systems:
Cold air

  • Contact cooling
  • Cryogen spray

How Many Treatments Will You Need?

Hair grows in cycles, which is why you can’t kill all the hair in one treatment (although it will reduce the growth for every treatment you have). The face typically takes more treatments than the body.

Body Part

Avg. Number of Treatments

Treatment Interval

Alex

YAG

MultiPlex

Lip

2-4

5-7

3-5

4 weeks

Face

4-6

5-7

4-6

4-6 weeks

Bikini Line

4-5

5-8

4-5

4-6 weeks

Arms

4-5

5-8

4-5

4-6 weeks

Underarms

4-5

5-8

4-5

4-6 weeks

Back

4-6

6-9

4-6

4-8 weeks

Legs

6-8

6-9

4-6

6-8 weeks

**Remember, this is an AVERAGE.

What Does It Feel Like?

The laser pulse is often described as a wave of heat with a sensation of a pinprick. Everyone has a different pain tolerance, and some areas hurt more than others. If it is too painful, the laser tech should have numbing cream on hand.

What Should It Look Like Post Treatment?

There are 3 goals in laser hair removal:

  1. Peri follicular edema (swelling around the hair follicle)
  2. The smell of burning hair
  3. Erythema (redness)

ßperifollicular edema

Redness should subside within 24-48 hours. Within 7-10 days the hair follicle which was killed will be expelled through the cell cycle.

Post Treatment Care

  • Apply aloe or lavender cream to the area for rehydration.
  • If blistering, apply an antibiotic cream.
  • Contact the office if you think you have a burn.
  • Normal skin care regiments can be resumed the day after treatment if there are no signs of being burned.

Laser Hair Removal Side Effects

There are usually few side effects with laser hair removal but you should always check with the person who is giving you the treatment to make sure they are qualified. The side effects which can be experienced in some individuals include pigmentary changes in the skin which include darkened or lightened areas, these changes are usually temporary. Rarely some people experience blisters or burns.

What it should not look like:

The evenly spaced circles are from the head of a laser as it pulses along.

If it’s tracked burns, it’s from an IPL.

Does it work?

Yes!!! LASER Hair Removal works when done correctly (with a LASER and by someone who knows how to use it!). The Boston Globe did a great article over the summer. Check it out. http://www.boston.com/news/health/articles/2010/07/05/are_laser_hair_removal_treatments_effective_and_safe/

XOXO,

Infrared LK

P.S.

Getting Implants– Entry 1

7 Sep

I’ve been working in Plastic Surgery for a few years, and I’ve never been under the knife. I finally made the decision to book a breast augmentation. This is my experience, from a patient point of view.

August 27, 2012

I guess I would consider this day an emotional roller coaster! I had just finished a brachioplasty with the plastic surgeon (as a surgical nurse) when I was called into his office. Long story short, surgery is booked for October 18.

My first reaction was obviously excitement. There may have been a point where I was jumping up and down… and clapping.

Of course, on this day, my mother was meeting my new boyfriend for the first time. Do I tell her? Do I tell my dad? Do I tell my boyfriend’s parents who have probably already read about it on facebook? Honestly, I’ve actually never questioned telling anybody anything I do (although, in hindsight I’ve questioned whether or not it was always appropriate); it was a really odd feeling! I figure, I’m a terrible liar, so I might as well just say it like it is:

“Mom, I’m getting a boob job.”

Things don’t really faze my mother at this point. There was a moment of déjà vu back to the night before my 18th birthday, when I told her I was getting a tattoo.

“How big?” she asked.

“Proportional” I answered. (I gave the wrong answer when I was 18, and I am fortunately not the owner of a GINORMOUS back tattoo, THANK GOD for my mother telling me to make it small!).

“It’s your body, whatever makes you happy.” Aw, mom!

It’s Your Body

Making the decision to undergo plastic surgery should never be anyone’s decision but your own. It should never be for a guy or under peer pressure of a friend. It is a major decision, and as with any surgery, it has risks. I’ve wanted to do this for years, but either I haven’t had the time or I haven’t had the money!

I want to be more proportional. I want my clothes to look good on (or off). And I don’t want to dread bathing suit season!

My reasons for doing this are healthy, and I am very happy with my decision.

August 9,2012 – My Consultation

Choosing size, shape, and style

There are a lot of options to consider when deciding on implants! The first question many ask is: “how big?” expecting an answer in cup size, I guess. But implants don’t come in cup size. They come in cc’s (cubic centimeters). In order to determine the size, shape, and style of implants that are best suitable, there are several things to consider:

  • Symmetry of your breasts
  • The width of your breasts in proportion to the chest wall
  • The characteristics of your breast tissue – how much tissue do you have? How much stretch do you have in your breast tissue?
  • Your goals and expectations for surgery
  • The location of the incision and the implant placement

The Age Old Question: Saline vs. Silicone

Saline

Silicone

Contents

Filled with sterile salt water.

Filled with soft, elastic gel.

May be pre-filled to a predetermined size, or filled at the time of surgery to allow for minor modifications in implant size (good for asymmetrical breasts).

Pre-filled and may require a longer incision for implant placement.

Consistency

Amount of fill affects the shape, firmness, and feel.

Feels and moves like natural tissue.

Risks

scar tissue, breast pain, infection, changes in nipple sensation, implant leakage or rupture.

same as saline.

Rippling

More likely

Less likely

Cost

Less expensive

More expensive

I chose silicone, because it is more natural looking and feeling.

Under the Muscle or Over?


The implant is placed in a pocket either directly behind the breast tissue (right) or underneath the pectoral muscle which is located between the breast tissue and chest wall.

I chose under the muscle.

Incisions, Incisions, Incisions?


An incision can be made either underneath the breast, just above the crease, around the lower edge of the areola or within the armpit.

One of the advantages of a saline-filled implant is that, because it is filled with saltwater after being inserted, only a small incision is needed. Often, an incision of less than one inch is made underneath the breast, just above the crease, where it is usually quite inconspicuous.

Another possible location for the incision is around the lower edge of the areola. A third alternative is to make a small incision within the armpit.

Once the incision is made, the surgeon creates a pocket into which the implant will be inserted, either under or over the muscle as previously discussed.

Smooth or Textured

The surface of the implant can be smooth or contoured. The contoured implants have little bumps on them (like gripping). They are teeny tiny. It’s hard to describe and the pictured don’t really help. But anyways, this keeps the implant exactly where it is placed.


smooth, round

textured, round

I choose textured.

Round or Oval Base

The base of the implant (or the back I guess you would call it when it’s inserted) can come in round or oval.

round

oval base (see how it’s wider)

We are still deciding this one. Leaning towards oval base.

Projection

The amount the implant sticks can be determined by the base to width ratio of the implant.

High Profile Implants

Have more projection per measurement of base diameter than a moderate profile breast implant. An added benefit of the high profile breast augmentation is that in order to create the profile, the side wall of the implant has more height, which may reduce visible rippling. These high profile breast implants will provide more anterior projection (front projection).

Moderate Profile (regular / standard)

These are the standard, creating a ‘normal’ profile. With a full and rounded look, this moderate profile breast implant adds a significant amount of dimension and volume to a woman’s breast. This could create a wider chest appearance, which would benefit those with a narrow chest.

Low Profile Implants

These breast implants have less projection per measurement of base diameter than a moderate profile breast implant.


Example:

200cc High Profile Implant (top in picture) is 9.8cm wide and 9.8cm tall. The projection is 4.9cm

210cc Moderate Profile Implant (bottom in picture) is 10cm wide and 11cm tall. The projection is 3.8cm.

Drawing not to scale. Sorry!

I chose moderate profile, again, because I want the most natural look.

Round or Contoured Implant Projection

Prior to Sientra’s new implant (more on Sientra below) the contoured implant eventually became more round due to the body’s muscle pulling on the silicone gel. The new “gummy bear” implant will keep it’s shape.

round shape

contoured

We are still discussing this as well, but we are probably going with contoured.

Breast Implant Manufacturers

Currently there are 3 companies that manufacture breast implants in the U.S. As of recent, a cohesive silicone gel implant manufactured by Sientra was approved by the FDA (after 8 years of clinical trials). I had heard of this hot new option in New Beauty Magazine (best magazine ever) a year or so ago. They have been nicknamed “gummy bear implants” because, like the candy, the implant has a rubbery consistency that holds its form well over time. This product is the most natural-looking breast shape, and lasts for many years.

The Sientra Implant has the lowest leak rate of all the implants currently approved. Even if the outer shell is ruptured, the silicone gel in the implant remains cohesive and doesn’t migrate to other parts of the body. (I would have tested this theory, but I’m not allowed to cut the implants in half at the office…)

The implant is the most natural looking. Because silicone gel is more cohesive, the risk of shell collapse producing a rippling effect seems to be lower. The implant is also fit to the person’s size and body type.

Less scar tissue
forms with this implant type. Capsular contracture is the medical term for scar tissue buildup and hardening around the implants – a condition that can be painful, and in severe cases, require surgery. The rate of scar tissue buildup appears to be much less with gummy bear implants.

I’ve basically been looking at breasts and reading about breast implants since the middle of August. (Is this what it feels like to think like a man?) Here are some sites I found interesting about Sientra’s new silicone implant (the second two are video’s).

http://www.sientra.com/

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/gummy-bear-breast-implants-future-breast-augmentation-surgery/story?id=16370362#.UEiTF2Hh-pg

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/09/gummy-bear-breast-implants_n_1413122.html

My Consultation Sizing


Before

492cc Implant

Before

492cc Implant


Safety during Pregnancy: What You Should and Shouldn’t Include In Your Beauty Regiment

6 Sep

It seems like it’s in the water with co-workers and friends (as evidenced by the three pregnant ladies to the left from Sylvestre Franc). I’ve had a lot of questions about what is and isn’t safe to do when you’re pregnant in regards to skin care products, laser, and injectables. It is understandable that women want to look their best during this time and hormonal changes during pregnancy can sometimes result in acne, unwanted hair growth, melasma and other skin problems. So what is safe to use and what isn’t?

Not surprisingly (to me anyways), there really is not a lot of information on product safety during pregnancy. The FDA rates products on their risks during pregnancy as follows:

Rating Definition

A

Controlled Studies Show No Risk.  Studies in pregnant women show the medication causes no increased risk to the fetus during pregnancy.

B

No Evidence of Risk In Humans.  Studies in pregnant women have not shown increased risk of fetal abnormalities despite adverse findings in animals or in the absence of adequate human studies, animal studies show no increased fetal risk.

C

Risk Cannot Be Ruled Out.  Studies are unavailable and animal studies have shown a risk to the fetus or are also lacking. There is a chance of fetal harm if taken during pregnancy but the potential benefits may outweigh the potential harm.

D

Positive Evidence Of Risk. Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy may outweigh the potential risk such as in life-threatening situations.

X

Contraindicated In Pregnancy. Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. The use of the product is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant.

Skin Care Products

Most skin care products fall into the Class C category; however, some products are recommended by doctors not to be used during pregnancy (although there is not enough evidence for or against them).


Not Recommended:

  • Retinoids
    • In A Practical Guide to Dermatological Drug Use in Pregnancy (Zip, MD, FRCPC) category B topical such as erythromycin, clindamycin, and benzoyl peroxide were recommended over topical tretinoin. This study states reports of congenital malformations in infants whose mothers used tretinoin during the first trimester.
    • This ingredient is found in anti-aging products such as moisturizers, and acne products.
    • Chemically a form of vitamin A, which in high doses can cause birth defects.
    • Oral retinoids, such as isotretinoin (Accutane, an acne treatment), are known to cause birth defects.


  • Beta Hydroxy acids (Salicylic Acid)
    • Ingredients used for their exfoliating and acne-treating properties. They penetrate deep inside the pores and clean out excess oil and dead skin cells that can clog pores and cause acne, blackheads and dull-looking skin.
    • High doses of the acid in its oral form have been shown in studies to cause complications and birth defects.
    • Small amounts applied topically are considered safe (over the counter face wash for example), but peels containing Salicylic Acid are not considered safe when pregnant.

  • Hydroquinone
    • Clinically used for pigmentation for conditions such as melasma, and it is used cosmetically as a skin-whitening agent. Although a large percentage of this topical agent is systemically absorbed, the use during pregnancy does not appear to be associated with increased risk of congenital defects. This finding, however, is based off one study, with a small sample size (so it is recommended to avoid hydroquinone during pregnancy).


Safe

  • Vitamin C, Glycolic acid, and Lactic Acid: derived from fruit and milk sugars, considered nontoxic.

  • Hyaluronic Acid. This is a product your body naturally produces (which means its safe). Because of its molecular size, hyaluronic acid cannot penetrate the skin’s surface, and it is not systemically absorbed.


  • Benzoyl peroxide. Only 5% of topical benzoyl peroxide is absorbed through the skin. It is completely metabolized to benzoic acid within the skin and excreted.

Self-Tanners

Dihydroxyacetone is a color additive that is found in self-tanning products to produce an artificial tan. Color develops following topical application. These products contain dihydroxyacetone in concentrations ranging from 1% to 15%, and when applied topically, systemic levels are minimal (0.5%), and are considered safe to use.

Hair Removal and Bleaching Agents

  • Sodium, calcium, and potassium hydroxide, which are also found in depilatory creams, disassociate into sodium, calcium, potassium, and hydroxide ions, which are all present in the human body. Topical application of these products would not disrupt serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy.
  • Hydrogen peroxide. Hair-bleaching creams contain low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, making it unlikely to be systemically absorbed. In addition, should it be absorbed, hydrogen peroxide is rapidly metabolized. Therefore, use of these products during pregnancy is not expected to be a concern when done in moderation.
  • Laser has some controversy as to whether or not it’s safe; again, there isn’t a lot of information. Lasers do not penetrate very deep and there is not chemical exchange into the body. One interesting thought from me, (not speaking from personal experience) the body becomes more sensitive during pregnancy, and some laser treatments hurt to begin with. I’m not sure I’d want to get laser under those circumstances!

Botox and Fillers

The safety of Botox injections during pregnancy is unknown (Class C), and while I wouldn’t recommend intentionally getting Botox injections during pregnancy, many women receive injections prior to being pregnant or when they do not know they are pregnant, and have not had any problems. Botox Cosmetic has never traveled systemically, and works only on the muscles into which it has been injected. Therefore, one could presume it is safe to undergo this procedure. But I still don’t recommend it.  Unless you’re planning on having a “Toddler and Tiara” baby.  Then it’s ok.

 

xoxo,

not pregnant LK


Image Salicylic Flash Peel followed by Glycolic/Retinol Peel

2 Sep

‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!  Yes! My skin was starting to break out from some life stress and my lackadaisical summer fun on the Cape was coming to a close (i.e. I will be out of prolonged sun exposure). My typical home-care regimen includes retinol and a skin lightener, which allows me to peel without prepping, so I was ready for my first peel of the season! I needed it too!

Pre-Peel Protocol

Prepping Your Skin for a Peel is very important.  At least 30 days prior to your peel you should not tan or burn your skin. And tanning or burning your skin should be a habit you avoid, in general. Also, it is advised that you discontinue use of any retinoids, retinols, glycolics, or AHA’s at least 48-72 hours before your chemical peel or any resurfacing treatment.

Customizing My Peel

The treatment I received was an Image Salicylic Peel followed by an Image Glycolic/Retinol Peel. The Salicylic Peel is designed for patients with acne, oily, or acne prone skin (me!). Salicylic Acid works to slow down the sebaceous gland, thus slowing oil production that clogs the pores. The Glycolic Acid gently exfoliates the dead skin cells, which in turn increases cellular turnover. In this case, we are also using the Salicylic Acid to dissolve the dead skin cells on the surface of my skin to therefore also allow the Glycolic/Retinol peel to penetrate my epidermis more evenly and allow for deeper penetration of the preceding peel, and therefore softer, smoother skin.

Anyone who has mature, dry, sensitive skin can have a peel, but some modifications would need to be made.

Step 1: Cleanse

My skin was cleansed with the Image Ageless Total Facial Cleanser, which contains 12% Glycolic Acid. Glycolic Acid is excellent for exfoliating the skin, leaving it fresher and brighter looking! The Ageless Total Facial Cleanser has a great tingly feeling, so you KNOW it’s working! It is excellent for keeping pores clear and occasional breakouts to a minimum.



Step 2: I-PREP Degreasing Solution (Professional Only Product…btw)

The degreasing solution is applied with gauze to remove as much of the surface oils on the skin as possible. This will allow for the product to evenly and more effectively penetrate the different layers of the epidermis (that’s a fancy word for skin)!

Step 3: Salicylic Peel is Quickly Applied and Then Removed

(this technique is referred to as a “flash” peel)

It is important for a peel to penetrate the epidermis to have visible improvement in the condition of your skin.

The white spots on my face is called frosting. Achieving frosting is the goal with chemical peels. This is a reaction of the skin’s proteins with an acid in a low pH resulting in coagulation. The lower the pH, the more coagulation will result. The peel destroys the existing tissues in order for the body to heal and make new tissue.

Image Skincare’s chemical peels have a low pH (which means they are strong acids) and are therefore able to penetrate more deeply into the epidermis, and thus make more new tissues.


Step 4: Image Skincare Glycolic/Retinol I-Peel Applied and left on up to 5 minutes.

This peel from Image is in an Aloe Vera base, so this allows the peel to be massaged into the skin. The Image peels also contain other healing properties, besides aloe vera, like Vitamin C, skin lighteners, brighteners, antioxidants and peptides. So, the peels are actually healing your skin, as they peel it, giving you a healthier result, faster, because your skin is less traumatized by the peel!


Step 5: Peel is quickly removed with cool water.


This is what my skin looked like just after the peel was removed. You will notice my skin is a bit flushed or a little red, this is called erythema and is a normal, expected side effect from a peel. One of the amazing things that chemical peels do is stimulate blood flow and increase the rate of skin turnover, bringing newer cells to the surface more rapidly. This allows skin to begin to appear smoother, more hydrated, and more plump. Also, the increased blood flow brings more nutrients to the skin, therefore creating healthier skin!



Step 6: Ormedic Balancing Gel Masque


An ultra-gentle, organic cooling gel masque developed for compromised, inflamed or irritated skin. Organic Aloe Vera, Arnica Montana and licorice quickly help reduce redness and other signs of irritation while bringing sensitive skin into healthy balance. Also may used for highly reactive, rosacea or acneic skin types

Step 7: Vital C Hydrating Enzyme Masque


Gently exfoliates dead skin with enzymes and adds essential anti-oxidants and minerals to improve skin health.

After

This is what I looked like immediately after removing the masques, my skin is already less red and inflamed, and the healing and rejuvenating process has begun!

24 Hours Later
(no make-up)

The first 24 hours after having this peel your skin will feel tight and shedding may occur. The skin may appear darker, due to the exfoliation of dead skin cells that has melanin present. This will gently shed off.

Post-Peel Protocol

After this peel I used an Image Post Peel Kit, which contains the Ormedic Cleanser, Max Cream, Skin Balancing Serum, Ormedic Balancing Masque, and SPF. These products are used post peel because they are gentle, contain peptides needed to heal, melanocyte suppressants, and aloe for redness/irritation. It is especially important to use SPF and stay out of the sun post peel. Products containing retinol (only time I recommend NOT using retinol), glycolic acid, or alpha hydroxyl acid’s for about 5 days.

Xoxo, LK

***Guess what!!! I’m finally going under the knife and getting breast implants! You might think I don’t need it from my picture above, but I assure you… it’s all Victoria’s Secret! Of course, I’ll be blogging about my experience!


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