Tag Archives: aesthetic

Non-Surgical Butt Augmentations with Sculptra

5 Jul

How To Get A Bigger Butt

Over the past 10 years the number of legitimate  butt implants has increased over 140% according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.  The number of fat grafting buttock lifts (Brazilian Butt Lift) is climbing at similar rate to implants.  Again, the Kardashian's influence over society.  

On the one hand, they really have opened the medical aesthetic market and probably saved it from collapse (there's an implant joke in here somewhere).  They do offer a lot of information to the public (although they manipulate the information they give so always remember–unless you are talking to an ACTUAL expert, information about plastic surgery, injectables, or skincare has no validity or reliability!)  They are however… idiots, for lack of a better word and are grossly miseducating the public on procedures. I'm not sure if I owe them royalties or not, but hopefully people who are planning on booking appointments in my office will have a better understanding of the procedures I offer.

There are 3 legal, safe, FDA-approved options to achieve that "Brazilian Butt Lift" (I mean BESIDES squats all day long).  


Butt Implants

Personally, I don't find this route to be the most aesthetically pleasing, and only know ONE person who has had a butt implant and been extremely happy and had no complications with this procedure (and this particular person does not have the most natural looking result, but they are happy with it!).  There can be extreme complications with putting a silicone implant in an area that is either in motion or bearing large amounts of weight (or both). Recovery is extreme and painful, and should there be a complication (this surgery has a very high infection rate) you're looking at up to 6 months out of work.   Even with a smooth procedure, long term complications such as the development of infection and shifting of the implant are possible.  

Surgical Butt Implants should be performed by a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.  Implants can be different sizes, shapes, and put in different places to achieve the aesthetic outcome the patient is looking for.  Be sure to discuss your expectations for projection, size, and proportion to other areas of your body (like hips!).  




Fat Transfer

In order to transfer fat, you must HAVE fat to transfer.  Plan on needing to be 10-20 lbs over the appropriate weight for your body prior to transfer (your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon will tell you exactly what you need to weigh for the treatment). This is a hard concept for a lot of my clients to understand. You have to actually be able to grab the fat away from the vital organs that it protects. Skin is not fat. It can be just as hard for some people to gain weight as it is for others to loose it. If you have a hard time gaining weight, a fat transfer may be a waste of money for you.  

Immediately post transfer, expect a dramatic result, but do not expect that as the final result. Remember, not all the fat will graft, and there is a signfiant amount of swelling post transfer. It is important not to overfill the buttocks when doing a transfer, even though you might think you should to get more fat to graft. The increased pressure from overfilled, stretched skin may actually cause the fat to die. Recovery time is minimal, and you should follow any post-treatment instructions given to you by your plastic surgeon.  

I do think this is a great option (I personally do not do ANY surgical procedures in my office, but have seen MANY excellent fat transfers–I especially see great results for Brazilian Butt-Lifts in Miami! If this is something that interests you, I'm happy to pass along a great board-certified MD–the experience of the Dr. matters! Do not do this procedure with a general surgeon! 

Non-Surgical Options 

This is what I have to offer to the mix. I have been injecting Sculptra for it's intended FDA-approved use for about 8 years, and over the past 2 years, I've been doing TONS of it. I've always found it to be one of the best investments anyone can make in their skin, but it the hardest treatment to explain in terms of investment value. Sculptra is not immediate, it takes multiple vials, and multiple treatments which correlate to the amount of collagen loss the patient had to start, and what their expectations are. Although it is a commitment of time and money upfront, it is much more cost effective and natural looking than fillers. My mother has had sculptra treatments, and personally I would love to be injected with sculptra (I can't inject myself). If you are a yoga person or a runner, sculptra is FOR YOU!

Anyways, back to butts…

Sculptra Aesthetic is made with biocompatible, biodegradable, synthetic material called poly-L-lactic acid, which is gradually and naturally absorbed by the body and helps to rebuild lost collagen through a series of treatments. The specialist injects treatment within the deep dermis, where strands of collagen support your skin’s structure. For significant volume increase, a session of sculptra for the buttocks is 6-10vials, and 2-3 treatments 6-8weeks apart are required. The low-end cost for one treatment is about $6,000 and can be up to $12,000 PER TREATMENT.  


This procudure is certainly not affordable to the average person, BUT this product doesn't need to be done singularly. For patients who have previously had a fat transfer, and need more defined sculpting done in certain areas, this can be a great adjunct treatment.  If there is a small area of indentation, assymetry, or concavity that bothers you, sculptra might be a cost-effective option.  

Combination Therapy For Butt Augmentation 

Sculptra should be discussed with anyone who is planning on undergoing a fat transfer prior to thier surgical appointment. Just like any other aesthetic investment, managing expectations are vital, and although the expectations of the treatment are explained and discussed during Informed Consent, the patient should also have an idea of what follow up treatments they may require and their cost.  

As of publication of this post, these are the ONLY safe, FDA-approved (but still considered off-label) procedures you should even CONSIDER undergoing. Yes, all of these options are expensive, but if you cut costs and receive something other than these 3 options, there is a high chance you will have severe complications such as necrosis (tissue death), limb loss, or even ACTUAL death.  But first you'll pay up in hospital fees, because complications of elective, non-FDA approved procedures–insurance will not be covering those costs.  PLEASE do not put anything in your body that isn't safe!  

How to Get Rid of Cellulite

Guess what!  A variation of this procedure gets rid of cellulite.  Treatments for cellulite have traditionally been disappointing for the consumer, but this treatment is awesome!  Stay tuned for more blog posts on sculptra for cellulite reduction!  

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Paying for Botox

11 Feb

 

Video Blogging… It Starts…

4 Nov

Here’s my first video blog!

Peanut Head: Volume Loss at the Temples

29 Jul

I’d argue the most over looked sign of aging is loss of volume in the temple. As we age, the temples lose fat and begin to narrow, shifting the balance of the face downward. Volume loss here contributes to the appearance of drooping and sagging of the cheeks and eyes (see Structural Changes in the Aging Face for other changes).  It begins as early as in your 20’s. It is most notable in athletes who have very little fat on their bodies, I’ve found especially runners.

As you can see, the area of total volume loss is pretty big when you actually look at it. In order to achieve the youthful contour of the temple, a patient will require a lot of product here. Adding filler to the temple is easy and almost painless, but deciding what filler to use can be difficult, they all have pro’s and con’s.

Juvéderm

This is usually my first choice with patients. For some reason… people tend to be nervous about filling this area! The great thing about Juvéderm is that it’s disolvable. The bad thing about Juvéderm is… you need a lot of it to fill this area, and that can be expensive. I’ve found great results by diluting the product before injection. The patient can see the result immediately. It may not last as long this way, but it is a good starting point. Most people love the result and usually step up to Sculptra when they notice they need a “refill.”


Radiesse

I personally don’t use Radiesse in the temples. It always reminds me of the scene from the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills when Adrienne Malouff’s husband injects Taylor and she has this big bump in her temple and Adrienne goes “is it supposed to look like that?” Although you get more volume with Radiesse, you also have more of a chance for lumps in this area. It’s not as smooth as Juvéderm (which is literally defined as a smooth consistency gel). It’s just not my preference, but for extreme volume lost I can see it being more cost effective.


Sculptra

I personally have had Sculptra injected into my temples. Sculptra is not a filler, but a biostimulator. Over several weeks post injection it promotes collagen production. It may take more than one treatment (usually 1-3 vials 1-3 treatments) to achieve the desired result. This is the longest lasting, and most cost effective product if you consider the longevity, but up front can be expensive. If you are the type of patient who is doing multiple fillers at a time, you should probably step up to Sculptra.


Fat Transfer

Fat injections can also be used in the temples but are only cost effective if a large amount of volume is needed for the entire face. I recommend only allowing a plastic surgeon perform this procedure (although a nurse can do it in Massachusetts). The fat is harvested from another area of the body (usually the lower back) via liposuction and transferred to areas of volume loss in the face (usually not just the temple). There is a lot of swelling and bruising with this treatment and not all the fat will graft (stay alive after transfer). It is also an expensive and invasive procedure. This being said, it can yield great results for patients who really need it.


The Procedure

Numbing cream is applied to the temple. The product selected is mixed with lidocaine and deposited on the bone until achieving desired volume. There is very little pain associated with all injectable products. Bruising isn’t typical; however, there are many vessels in this area, so it can happen. Expected cost depends on the product selected, but expect to use at least 1-2 syringes during time of treatment.

Good luck!

Will it hurt?

24 Nov

Pain is such an abstract and obscure concept. You can’t really define it. It has so many dimensions. In the hospital, we assess pain on a scale of either facial expression charts or numerically from 0-10. Zero being no pain, and 10 being the worst pain you’ve ever felt in your life. It is an individual experience; the numerical response to a stimulus can differ drastically from person to person. So, whether or not something will hurt is relative.

    Source: http://www.pamz.com

On a Scale of 0-10…

What’s the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced? First, a broken heart. That took a really long time to recover from… and I definitely still have scars! The second most painful thing I’ve ever endured is being in a car accident, which I also still have issues from. I’ve never gone through childbirth, never been divorced, still have both my parents, and never had a kidney stone. So my list has room to change. I’d like to point out that my list does not include Botox, Fillers, or my recent surgery. But that’s what this post is about. Do aesthetic procedures hurt as much as people think they will?

Beauty is Pain

We’ve all endured painful treatments in the name of beauty. Ever tweezed your eyebrows? Waxed your lip? Burned yourself with a curling iron? Stuck an eyelash wand in your eye? Walked more than a street block in stilettos? All painful, but relatable, every day examples of things women do in the name of beauty.

If you asked 100 women the same question, you’d get a 100 different answers. This is because women never have a “yes” or “no” answer. It’s always a story. So here’s a comparison story.

Q: How painful are stilettos?

A: Well, that depends.

  • How big are the stilettos
  • How long are you wearing them for
  • How far will you need to walk in them
  • Who makes them
  • How often do you wear stilettos
  • How often do you wear those particular stilettos (i.e. are they broken in)
  • What condition are your feet in (i.e. do you have any blisters)
  • What size are the stilettos vs. what size are your feet (i.e. does the shoe fit)
  • What are the road conditions for which you will be walking in them (i.e. changes in elevation)
  • What are the weather conditions for which you will be wearing them (i.e. rain or snow, inside or out)
  • Etc, ect, ect.

So, when you ask how badly something will hurt, there are many conditions which will change the outcome. It’s hard to explain the pain factor of beauty. The “Universal Pain Assessment Scale” does not really work when it comes to women and what they’re willing to endure. So… I decided to paint my own comparative scale. Because I love “Paint” (the computer program) and I love making stuff relatable.

The “LK Aesthetic Comparative Assessment Scale”

I’m not going to lie. This took me a long time to create, and it’s pretty scientific (although has no reliability or validity, it is merely my projections). This is how it works. Each treatment is rated in 3 dimensions on a scale of 1-5. Then those 3 numbers are added.

Chemical Peels

Laser Hair Removal


Laser on the Face



Eyeliner Tattoo


Botox


Fillers


Some fillers hurt more than others. The worst is the lips. I used that for the pain scale, but other areas hurt much less.

Tear Troughs    2

Cheeks        2

Marionette Lines    3

Naso-Labial Folds    3

Plastic Surgery

In all fairness… I think surgeries could be subcategorized. I heard liposuction isn’t really that bad. I guess it depends how well you are medicated too. Pain is relative.

I Hope this gave some perspective! Remember, this scale holds no scientific basis.

XOXO. LK.

My Breast Augmentation: Day Before and Day of Surgery

24 Oct

**Disclaimer: I wrote this 2 days post-op and still medicated with narcotics. If anything I say makes no sense… there will be a retraction printed in the future. I just am so excited to write this!!!!

Getting Implants– Entry 1.

October 17: The Day Before

What does one do the day before surgery? I realized I would be out of commission for a good week. In a normal week, there is work and cleaning, and grocery shopping. Preparing for being out for a week, I needed to do extra cleaning, work, and grocery shopping. I had to make sure all my laundry was cleaned and put away. There was food in the refrigerator. My boyfriend tried to convince me I had to make up for a week’s worth of sex (oh boys!). All my meds had to be picked up. I had to pack for my friend’s house… the normal stuff. I also had to get my gel nail polish taken off, my hair extensions fixed, and my eyelash extensions filled (normal? I’m not sure…?).

I got home from work at 11:30, just as Aaron was getting home. I got in the shower, washed my hair, and had my last drink of water (no food or water after midnight). I hadn’t been scared or nervous all day. But I usually do have difficulty sleeping when I’m nervous. Aaron gave me a night-night cocktail (aka Nyquil and ibuprofen) and slept like a baby (not medically prescribed mind you—do not try this at home).

October 18: 5am

Ungodly hour. Normally the only time I make the exception to be awake this early is if:

  1. I’m still up partying from the night before (which hasn’t happened since my UMass Amherst days—I SWEAR……….)
  2. I’m leaving on a plane for Mexico with the Donohue’s (from Donohue’s Bar and Grill in Watertown which is the most fun bar EVER).
  3. I’M GOING TO GET MY BOOBS DONE!!!!

I threw up a zip up sweatshirt (I didn’t want to put on anything that would have to go over the head) and some sweat pants. Don’t forget, it’s difficult to put your arms up over your head post op. Then that age old question hit me. Do I wear underwear? I decided there was probably super special sexy hospital underwear to put on. So I skipped. (They did give me some super sexy briefs at the hospital as I expected.)

Don’t I look hot at 5am?

5:15 AM

I of course forgot to pick up my post op meds (which you should ALWAYS do before surgery). My awesome boyfriend took me to the 24 hour CVS to pick up my vicodin, oxycodone, and antibiotics.

6:00 AM

Caitlyn McGrath arrives in a Ford 950 (whichever the really, really big one is). Cait normally drives a Volkswagen. I’m all like, Cait, why do you have this ginormous vehicle? And she’s all like… Well I didn’t have gas in my car, so I took my boyfriends. So I’d like to give a shout out to Pat from the Sitchiute Fire Department for lending the getaway car. We did have to make a 3 point turn at one point. It was not pretty. (Female Quincy drivers = THE worst).

Are you PSYCHED?!?!” she asked me. I was like, Cait, it’s 5 o’clock in the morning. Please. Stop yelling. (I don’t even think she really was yelling).

Cait is one of the lead medical aestheticians at Dr. Russo’s office and is in Nursing School, so she got super top secret clearance to be in on my case. Like FBI style. I’m so glad she was there. She knew every doctor/nurse/surgical assistant that walked into my room. And confirmed with me that they were all THE best.

6:15 AM

My nurse Maureen comes in, does my vitals, asks all my medical history questions, and inserts my IV (perfectly on the first try might I add). I signed a bunch of papers and started to get a little nervous, but like that first day of school nervous. That excited, this is going to be awesome kind of nervous.

7:00 AM

Dr. Russo arrived and marked my breasts for the incisions. Then the nice nurse anesthetist came in and gave me something to relax through my IV. I remember being wheeled into the OR room. 5. 4. 3. And see ya later. I was out for the next few hours.

Apparently I woke up at spoke to Caitlyn a little bit, but I definitely don’t remember that.


All bandaged up.


The bandages stay on for about 7 days. You can’t get them wet (i.e. no showering. Iiiiiiick).

2:30 PM

My friend Jen P. came and picked me up and drove me to my other friend Julie’s (when I say this surgery was a TEAM effort, I am not kidding!). Julie is an awesome recovery room nurse and she and I decided it would be best if I stayed with her for the first two days post op. I am SO glad I did.

Even with the meds I was on I was still in a good amount of pain. Julie had to bear hug assist me up off the couch (I couldn’t push up with my arms because it was too painful). She also helped me keep a medication schedule and made sure I got my meds every 3 hours. And last, and most embarrassingly, she helped me pull my pants up when I had to use the bathroom.

5:00 PM

My boyfriend came and brought me beautiful flowers and told me how much he loved me. Awwwwww. He also brought me his fleece because it smells like him and I’m a dork and it helped me sleep. J


6:00 PM

The party reallllllyyyyy begins. Kathy Nash (owner of KN MedSpa in Natick) arrives. I am really lucky to have such great friends to take care of me, medicate me, dress me, and help me keep my mind off of the surgery. It is not uncommon to have feelings of being overwhelmed or depressed after surgery. My crew kept a close eye on me to make sure I was mentally and physically stable. Errrrr… baseline…. for me.

  • A Funny Nurse’s Note From the Girls –


Baci, D.O.G. wearing my A sized bra. Awwwww. He looks like such a tuff guy… in a bra.


What! We couldn’t let Baci D.O.G. have all the fun.

A little comparison was in order from old bras to new bras.

October 19

Feeling like a million bucks. Staid on my medication schedule. It’s important to do this for the first day or two post op because you don’t want to get behind with pain. It’s hard to catch up. But I was up walking around once an hour. Feeling pretty good. I know pain worries a lot of people, but at most I felt uncomfortable right before I needed my meds.

Julie took me to Corbu Salon in Cambridge so my friend Devon could wash my hair (felt soooo good!) while Julie got hers highlighted. Thank god for all my friends in the hair industry as well! I mean, I might not have been able to shower for a week, but at least my hair could look good!

My post-op follow up is 10/24. So expect another post about post-operative care shortly!

As of today, I am SO happy. I’ve waited years to do this, and it has been the ONLY thing that has ever bothered me about my body. It’s hard to feel comfortable in your own skin, but whatever helps you do it, then do it. Just don’t go overboard!

xoxo LK

Glam Girls Go Camping Too!

18 Aug

So, I’m totally in love (no sillies, with someone besides myself!) and I went camping. This girl, right here. So… if you don’t know me… I’m the stilletto’s and fake hair type. Fully manicured. My friends and clients got a KICK out of me going camping. But, I did it, because you can do anything for a weekend and because my awesome boyfriend told me I could bring as many bags as I want and he will carry them. I considered that a challenge. So here goes.

 

I’m going on a Camping Trip and I’m bringing:

A:

  • Airmattress
  • Aloe
  • Allergy medicine

B:

  • Burberry Sunglasses
  • Bells (just in case of Bears)
  • Bug Spray (4 days = 4 cans)
  • Bikini’s
  • Batteries
  • Band aids
  • Boyfriend

C:

  • Clothes (as you can see each outfit is individually packed in a ziplock bag, making getting dressed fast and easy)
  •  

  • Calamine lotion

D:

  • Dry shampoo
  • Daisy (the dog) and a Duck (just kidding he was already in Maine)

 

 

 

F:

  • Flannel Sheets

G:

  • Gloves

H:

  • Hair: Oh god, this was scary. Apparently, wearing your hair down is a bad idea, it will get dirtier faster. Also, apparently bandana’s are you friend. And braids. I like braids though.
    • Silk scarf for night
    • Headband
    • 2 hair ties
    • Bandana!!!!

  • Hat
  • Hydracortisone cream
  • Hookah

I:

  • Ipod and Idock (what, even in the woods I like to dance!)

J:

  • Jeans

L:

  • lighter

M:

  • Mirror

N:

  • Nail file

P:

  • Pillows (because one is never enough)

R:

  • Raincoat

S:

  • Sunblock (tinted)
  • Smores
  • Sleeping bag
  • Shoes:
    • Sneakers
    • Flip flops
    • Slippers

T:

  • Toilet paper
  • Tweezers for ticks
  • Tylenol (because of the hangovers)
  • Towels
  • Toothbrush
  • toothpaste

U:

  • Underwear
  • Umass Hoodies (or college sweatshirt of your choosing)

W:

  • Wool socks
  • Waterhouse’s flashlight (Waterhouse is a friend of mine whom I stole a flashlight from.)
  • Wet naps
  • Wine (in the box. It’s going to be a long weekend… ok fine it was tequila… but wine sounds so much classier…)

X:

  • Xanex (just in case)

 

It was a really fun weekend, and I can see why people enjoy camping. I did wind up in the lake with all my clothes on after a possible poison sumac encounter. It was pretty funny. I think I’ll stick to camping once a year.

Pictures courtesy of Lauren Coffey. Thanks Lauren!!

 

It’s good to be home and back in a Betsy (Johnson).

XOXO, LK

 

 

What Goes Where?

4 Aug

Prior to 2002, there was one type of facial filler: collagen. Many products have been developed over the past ten years which have caused collagen to become obsolete. There are now multiple categories of fillers, all made of different materials. The products in these subcategories have properties which make them better in treating some signs of aging than other areas or other products. Remember, fillers are different than Botox (it’s not all just Botox!). So what goes where?

Hyaluronic Acid (HA’s)

Synthetic forms of hyaluronic acid (a sugar that your body naturally produces) include products like Juvéderm, Perlene and Restylane. HA’s increase fullness and enhance the viscosity of the naturally occurring hyaluronic acid in your body. Although it may cost a little more, Juvéderm is currently the longest lasting product (in some cases lasts twice as long, and therefore is worth the extra $100 or so per syringe). I have performed over 200 Juvéderm procedures, and have personally been injected with this product many times!

*note: My face is just a model, I haven’ had all this work done I swear! I just love “Paint.”

  • Best for superficial lines (not very deep, not folds).
  • They are used in areas where “plumpness” is desired (like your lips!)
  • They can be used in cheek augmentation, vertical lip lines, and nasolabial folds, but might not be the best product. Cheeks and Nasolabial folds typically require a lot of filler, and cost-effectiveness wise, this isn’t the product. But if you just need to fix a little sagging, it can be used in the cheeks. If you want to overpay for deep nasolabial folds, then this product also can be placed in this area.
  • Vertical Lip Lines are usually superficial, which would make Juvéderm a good product, HOWEVER, if it is not placed right, the result is a monkey face.

Tips on Hyaluronic Acid

  • When I’m filling lines in the glabella, I always administer a dose of Botox to the area 2 weeks before injecting Juvéderm. This allows me to inject directly into the line; it is easier to aim at a stationary target! How do you know if you will need Botox and Fillers? If you have a line in between your brows at rest (a “1”, “11”, or “111”) and you pull that line apart with your fingers, do you still see a crease in the skin? If yes, you need both, if no, Botox is enough.
  • I always apply numbing cream 20 minutes before injections.
  • I never inject too close to the outer rim of the eye (distal orbital rim), it usually irregularities in the contour of the face.
  • Injecting into the tear trough is a very advanced procedure. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen this area over filled (which looks TERRIBLE). My recommendation: it is better to under-fill and book a follow-up. This area requires a minimal amount of product, and my personal policy is to allow a client to come back at no charge if they require a small amount more (within reason).

Particulated Fillers

These products, like Radiesse and ArteFill, contain synthetic beads or particles in different liquid carriers. They last longer than HA’s, because the body doesn’t break them down as fast. They are also thicker than HA’s, which means they satisfy a larger area of volume loss. These products are injected deeper in the layers of skin (never superficially like HA’s are). Why? Because they’re made out of beads in liquid… and in superficial skin that would make bumps! This means they NEVER get injected into the tear troughs or into the lips. EVER. For very, very deep glabellar crease, Radiesse can be used (but usually an HA is a better choice).

  • These products are for moderate to severe volume loss. As you age, facial skeletal changes, general tissue volume loss, and the effects of gravity flatten out your cheeks. If you look at the contour of my face on right side of my face (your left), you will see how round my cheek is. I think you can see in this picture that the apples of my cheeks are round as well. A lot of women will look in the mirror at their nasolabial folds and want to go straight for filling only those, but that doesn’t give the youthful round shape back to the face. On some people I like to do cheek augmentation with Radiesse as well as nasolabial folds. I always do cheeks before folds, because the cheek bone is the scaffolding for the lower face skin. When you change that, the depth of the NL fold will also change. Always top to bottom, never bottom to top, when it comes to your face fillers! **When you have extra weight on your face, you keep the roundness. Skinny people have really flat cheeks when they age. HA. Take that skinny people.
  • The marionette lines, prejowel, and oral commissure are usually treated as one area that needs to be fixed. They’re kind of like vector components of each other (for all you Geometry dorks out there, *brushes shoulder off*).
  • Again, skeletal changes that occur as you age cause your chin to recess and along with volume loss, change the angles of your jaw and chin. This is another area a lot of people overlook when spending that quality time in the mirror pulling at their face in the “this is what I would look like if I had a face-lift” pose. Even if you do have a traditional facelift, you aren’t doing anything about the volume loss. This contributes to the unnatural look of a face-lift.
  • Radiesse and Juvéderm can be used in conjunction to fix contour irregularities in the nose.

I hope that cleared up the two main classes of fillers. It’s a lot of information!!! The next post will be about Sculptra, which gets grouped in with fillers… but this is already too long! Lol.

xoxo SPRAY TAN – O – REXIC LK

Everybody’s Doing It!

29 Jul

“My wife’s into that Botox Stuff” – weird guy on the cape trying to give me vodka. ????

Anyways, it seems like everybody’s into “that Botox stuff.” But no one will admit to it!!! What’s the deal people? I mean… I fully admit to being an addict. I love my Botox! I guess I’m a little on the young side (although my birthday is coming up July 31!! Yeah!). So who exactly is doing this “Botox stuff”? Here’s some excerpts from my business plan on the “consumer profile” (I wrote this in 2009, so… there is updated information… but… I haven’t updated my stuff. I HATE making graphs on the computer… but if you gave me some colored pens and a whiteboard I would be ALL over it!).

Consumers

A survey by the Aesthetic Cosmetic Surgery Education & Research Foundation (ASERF), 2009, found the typical patient “married, working mother between 41-55 years of age with a household income of under $100,000.” These women were also found to be “health-conscious,” exercising, and eating right. Nearly 7/10 of the responders regard Botox and dermal fillers as an important part of their aesthetic routine.

Smart, health-conscious women ahhhhh? That makes me happy.

Age Distribution

Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

12,000

371,501

1,256,608

734,751

182,098

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0

9,844

55,635

41,118

11,880

Hyaluronic Acid

3,919

168,629

604,262

420,069

116,159

I’m assuming any of these 18 and under year olds are using Botox for non-cosmetic use, or for correction of facial deformities. Or… they are on “Toddler’s and Tiara’s.”

Percentage totals of Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

0.5%

14.5%

41.1%

36.2%

7.7%

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0%

8.3%

47.0%

34.7%

10.0%

Hyaluronic Acid

0.3%

12.8%

46.0%

32.0%

8.8%

Gender

In a recent survey by RealSelf.com, of the people who would get cosmetic work, the percentage of men is climbing. Ya, it’s true! Men are vain too! And not just gays! I was sitting in a bar eating by myself (yea… I was banished from my dinner party…) and I met a couple from New York. They were so much fun! The husband and the wife did botox… and they’ve been together for 12 years. And they still liked each other. And other people (like me) had a blast talking to them. …You know me and my tangents. Anyways. Good looking people are happy and stay married longer. I’m not sure if it’s true or not… I actually made that up. But men really are doing the “botox stuff”!

Would Get Cosmetic Work:

18-34

35-44

45-54

55+

Men

64%

67%

64%

47%

Women

82%

82%

80%

71%

From 2008-2009, minimally-invasive procedures increased 2% in the male market (ASPS, 5). And I assure you, it’s not just gay men doing this! I have a pretty large percentage (ok… I have a few) straight men doing this “Botox Stuff.”

                                Source ASPS, 2010 (8, 10)

Location:

The Northeast Region charges the highest amount in fees in the minimally invasive cosmetics procedures industries.

According to 2009 Regional Distribution Data by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, New England holds 20% of the Botox market and 31% (the largest) of the soft-tissue filler market.

Percent of Total Procedures Performed by Region

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5
Botulinum Toxin

20%

14% 23% 15% 28%
Calcium Hydroxylapatite 35% 16% 20% 15% 15%
Hyaluronic acid 31% 12% 18% 8% 31%

Source: ASPS 2010 (15)

The Northeast Region has the highest percentage of filler procedures performed (we are Region 1). Midwest is the yellow region 2. Region 3 is light blue. Region 4 is greenish. Five is purple. Interestingly, the Noretheast and West Coast are comparable in the procedures performed. I wonder how much L.A. and New York skew that though. And Miami probably skews region 3. Just saying. Statistics are only as good as their interpretation.

Income level

Data collected by the ASPS in “Demographic Changes among Plastic Surgery Patients” demonstrates that income no longer plays a significant role in elective procedures (1). With the adjunct on patient financing options, the numbers continue to increase.

According to an Allergan Representative, the average income level for a Botox Cosmetic patient is $50,000 nationally.

Social Class

Middle to Upper Class due to income level.

Education

Education level has not shown to be a significant factor in market; however the consumer of the Northeastern market wants to be educated on products/procedures before undergoing them.

Ethnicity:

                Source: ASPS 2009 Cosmetic and Reconstructive Demographics

Most Commonly Requested Minimally-Invasive Procedures for Ethnic Patients

African-American

Asian-American

Hispanic

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Source: ASPS 2010 (17)

Boston Market

And I’m not talking about chicken. Finding this information was pretty difficult, but I think I know my market pretty well. If you are under 35, you are probably not thinking about Botox or fillers… but honestly you should be. Remember, volume loss starts at 25. Being preventative is super important, and will cost less and look the most natural in the long run. At the very least, please use medical grade skin care!

If you’re over 35, it’s a good idea to start with the area that bothers you most. Have a long consult with your injector. Work out a schedule/plan with your provider, and make sure you talk about prices! That plan should ALWAYS start with good skin care!!!

I know your mom might disagree… but…

If Everybody’s Doing It, Shouldn’t You Be Too?


xoxo,

LK

Ahhhh… Big Ange is getting the “Botox Stuff.” LOVE IT! (Ok… well maybe she’s not the best ambassador of the Botox Nation. When do I get a t.v. show?)

Prepping Your Skin for a Peel

28 Jun

It’s not exactly the best time of year to be doing chemical peels (or laser treatments) because most people want to be outside enjoying the sun. But I’ve been doing a lot of training with Alexis Robertson, the Massachusetts rep for Image Skin Care, and I just finished reading a book she gave me on Chemical Peeling. So I had to post something before I gave her back her book! Stay tuned for more posts on different types of Peels or start researching with   ‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!.


ßAlexis is peeling Andrea Purcell, an excellent aesthetician in North Reading at Stephanie Cogliano on Main Street. Andrea is a candidate for a peel in the summer because she has prepped her skin, and she will not be in the sun. She is a trained professional.

Why Peel?

Chemical Peels are great ways to reduce fine lines and wrinkles, clear up acne, and fade hyperpigmentation. But before you have a peel there are a few things you should be using on your skin to prep it. This will ensure you get the best results from your peel. Ideally, these products should be started two to four weeks before a peel, depending on the state of your skin to start and the type of peel that you will be receiving.

Prepping is important for several reasons.

  • It will reduce wound healing time.
  • Allow for more uniform penetration of the peeling agent.
  • Decrease the risk of post inflammatory hyperpigmentation.
  • Enforce the concept of a maintenance regimen and determine which products your skin tolerates.
  • Establish compliance and eliminate inappropriate peel candidates.

So what products should you be using to prep your skin? Here’s a little guide.

Retinoic Acid

(ex. Retin A, Trenitoin) By now you should know how much I love retinol! The use of Retinoic Acid 2 weeks before a TCA peel will speed up re-epithelization of cells (which prevents infection). Since Retinoic Acid thins the top layer of dead skin cells (stratum corneum), it allows for better penetration of the peeling agent. Retinoic Acid has also been shown to have some skin lightening effects. It is also my FAVORITE skin care product.  More on Retinoic Acid (my fav!).

 

AHA’s

(ex. Glycolic acid) AHA products also thin the stratum corneum and allow better penetration of peeling agents. They also have been shown to have some skin lightening effects.

*My Favorite Product EVER is an AHA/RETINAL Blend:


MD Reconstructive Repair Crème. Hands down best product on the market.

Bleaching Agents

(ex. Hydroquinone, kojic acid) These products are not exactly bleaching your skin. They inhibit tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in the production of melanin, making hyperpigmentation reactions less likely. Personally, I love kojic acid, it smells like Mexico. No, not the dirty part… the part that smells like Piña Coladas. We will from now on refer to this product as the Cancun of skin care. Minus the hangover.

Currently, there is some controversy over the use of hydroquinone. It should not be used for long periods of time, or on pigmentation that is caused by hormones (also known as melasma). Be careful with this ingredient. It’s used in a lot of medical product lines (like Obagi… which I’m not a fan of).

Sunblock

Get used to it. SPF BABY! Remember stick to physical blocks with Zinc.  It’s Sunny Out! (A Post in Honor of Sun Block).

So why is it important to establish a baseline?

By starting on products prior to peeling, a baseline can be established as to what your skin normally tolerates when it’s not inflamed or irritated. Also it establishes some good habits, like the need to wear sunscreen. If you go in for a peel, and you don’t wear sunscreen, you are going to be in some serious trouble. The same goes with using Retinol products. But, it all honesty, we sometimes ignore home care instructions because we don’t understand why we are being told we need to do something. We need a consequence before we follow a rule. Well… I forgot sunscreen one time while using retinol. I won’t do that again. Caused my own little chemical peel. Not pretty.

Noncompliance is a HUGE problem in health care. And chemical peels can be dangerous if you’re not going to listen to post care instructions. If you can’t follow a few instructions before a peel, you certainly aren’t going to follow them after. This just proves to you and your skin person that you are not an eligible candidate for a peel. But if you CAN follow instructions, it gets you into a good regiment which you will need to continue post peel. Remember, your skin cells are constantly cycling, and therefore it is extremely important to ALWAYS be taking care of them.

This is not a one and done procedure (like liposuction is… lol.).

“Youth No Longer Wasted On the Young”


Love LK.

P.S. I am sticking to being brunette. But I’m keeping my twitter name as @Boston_Barbie. I will forever be a blonde (and a child) at heart. You can follow me and Alexis at @ImageSkinCareMA.

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