Tag Archives: attractiveness

You’ll Never Guess What I Tattoo’ed

17 Dec

My Eyeliner!

A Post About Permanent Make-up

My friend Sally (a gorgeous Moroccan woman) was telling me she really wanted her eyeliner tattoo’d.  Waking up looking the same as when I go to bed is my lazy life dream!  And before you respond that we’re nuts… Let’s look at the facts.  Do you agree:

– You spend about $100 a year on eyeliner.

– Perfect eyeliner requires a Masters in Art.

– Waking up next to someone with black raccoon eyes… shameful (on multiple levels!)

– Getting ready takes a really long, annoying time (Have you ever noticed? A Woman’s “I’ll be ready in FIVE minutes” & a man’s “I’ll be home in FIVE minutes” are exactly the same?)

– Tattoo’s are AWESOME.  (I have 3 extremely tasteful works of art. O.k., 2 are extremely tasteful and 1 is a tramp stamp that I got when I was 18, but I still love it!  And it’s over 10 years old… so HA mom and dad!)

The Research:

I research EVERYTHING before I do it.  And I do it from a medical perspective.  As a Registered Nurse, I have a lot more general knowledge about health and the human body than the average beauty writer.  Here is some interesting information I came across on my background search.

Permanent makeup: (noun) aka micropigmentation, is a
cosmetic technique in which an organic pigment is
embedded into the dermis in a fashion to resemble
make-up.  Common areas are lips, eyeliner, and
eyebrows.  It can also be used to disguise scars and
spots in the skin. FUN FACT:  You can use it to restore
or enhance the breast's aureola after breast
augmentation or reduction (I think this is
awesome...ly funny!  Who knew!).

History:

Dates back to the 20th century, with George Burchett describing it as fashionable in the 1930’s.  I was surprised that there was no information on tattoo’ing from any early cultures.  I figured surely the ancient Egyptians used needles and eyeliner!

Regulations:  In most areas it falls under the cognizance of the Department of Health, State Boards of Cosmetology are often the oversight agency.  In some areas, a cosmetology or esthetics license is required, while in others, these people are prohibited and only a nurse or doctor can perform these procedures.  Some states forbid it completely.  Fortunately, if Mass were to ever abolish permanent make-up, NH is only an hours ride away!

My Experience

It’s official.  I realized I’m insane!  I’m glad I didn’t REALLY think about it before I did it… because Permanent make-up is anxiety provoking!  I highly recommend taking a xanex or something before a procedure like this!

I would also like to note that I told my mother I was doing this and she didn’t even bat an eyelash.

Sally and I went to a cosmetic artist that came with stellar recommendations.  As we entered into her basement shop (just kidding!) … I was so excited walking in the door!

I went first, laying on the cosmetic bed.  We talked about tattoos while I lay with Emla Cream on my eyes.  The artist explained the whole procedure to me as I numbed.  We discussed what kind of style I wanted and what color would be best with my eyes.  I decided I just wanted my lash lines done in black ink.  I don’t like trendy things… I like a classic look.  Trends come in and out of style, and I didn’t want anything permanent on my face that might go out of style!

After a half hour with the numbing cream on my eyes, we started the procedure.  Lidocaine with epinephrine was injected into my eyelid to numb the pain and keep the bleeding to a minimum (I don’t think it bled at all actually).  I’m sure you’re all wondering:  Did it hurt?  No… It really didn’t.  It felt weird!  There was a buzzing and a vibrating and the knowledge that there was a needle… really close to my eye.  Anxiety!  Actually I think I was totally fine until we got to the lower lashes… When I needed to open my eye while the tattoo was being applied.  It was nuts!!!  I realized at this point that I am absolutely insane!  And I love it.

It took about two hours total.  By the end it was starting to hurt a little and I had enough.  Many people do tattoos in sessions because of swelling.  I had some ice on my eyes for a few minutes while the ink was cleaned off and the lidocaine wore off so I could open my eyes again.  Vaseline was put on the tattoo (I forget why).

I finally got to look in the mirror.  More anxiety!

It looks amazing and I love it!

I have a lot of friends with tattoos, I’d like to shout out to my friend Angel right here, who has a sleeve from some Gothic Artist.  Surprisingly, my friends with tattoos, ESPECIALLY Angel, were telling me not to do this.  Even Angel loves it though!

Follow-up and Post-care

I will need to go back in 3 weeks and have the line neatened and the rest finished.

For 4 days:

  • No make-up
  • Rinse the eye twice a day with saline
  • Apply Vaseline to the lash line
  • Ice, Ice, Ice!
*Note:  My eyes are really swollen in the pictures.  I didn’t Ice, Ice, Ice enough.
 
**Note 2:  I could not fill my eyelash extensions before the procedure.  That is why they look RIDICULOUS. 

Anatomy of a Facial

3 Dec

A facial is a procedure involving a variety of skin treatments, including: steam, exfoliation, extraction, creams, lotions, facial masks, peels, and massage.  Facials can last anywhere from 30 minutes to over an hour and range in price depending on the types of products used for the treatments.  They are professionally recommended every 4 weeks for maximum results. Step 1: See a Professional.

All facials follow the same basic structure and order. They will begin with makeup removal and cleansing.  Then comes some method of exfoliation to remove dead skin cells and smooth the surface of the skin. A massage is then performed that can include all or some of the scalp, face, neck, shoulders, back and even the hands or feet.

Facials are then classified in two ways:  hands on treatment or electrotherapy.

“Hands-on” Treatment

The aesthetician will use her hands to perform the facial treatment. Sometimes, a steam machine is incorporated in these facials during or after cleansing, to open up the pores and allow a deeper cleansing action.

A facial mask is a creamy paste (or gel) that often contains minerals, vitamins, essential oils, and fruit extracts is the main step in the hands on treatment.  There are different kinds of masks for different purposes: deep-cleansing, by penetrating the pores; healing acne scars or hyper-pigmentation; brightening, for a gradual illumination of the skin tone.

Gels are mostly used for oily and acne prone skins and oils or moisturizing creams are used for dry to normal and matured skin types.  A clay or mud based face pack is used after the cleansing process and steam process (optional) is over to close the open pores and to provide nutrition to the skin.

Masks are removed by either rinsing the face with water, wiping if off with a damp cloth, or peeling off of the face by hand.  Duration for wearing a mask varies.  The perceived effects of a facial mask treatment include revitalizing, healing, or refreshing; and, may yield temporary or long-term benefits.

Electorotherapy Facials

Use machines as part of the treatment; there are several different types, which are suited to different skin types. Some of the most popular variations of this type of facial are:

  • Galvanic treatments: metal rollers or applicators are used to either produce a deep cleansing effect.  Depending on the active product being used, this will help reduce spots and blemishes (making this a good facial for an oily skin type), or to help infuse active ingredients deeper in to the skin (for a variety of skin types).
  • High frequency treatments: uses a glass electrode passed over gauze placed on the skin. This helps dry out spots and has an antibacterial effect, so is good for oilier skins or those with a few specific blemishes.  An indirect high frequency facial uses a saturator held by the client to draw a moisturizing massage medium deeper in to the skin, and so is best suited for more mature or dry skin types.
  • Microcurrent treatments: also known as non-surgical face lift, this type of facial uses a current to lift and tone the facial muscles and also to improve the colour and texture of the skin and soften lines.

During most of the electrotherapy treatments you may experience a slight tingling effect on the skin, but this is quite normal.

Facials are key to having nice skin!  They need to be maintained with a home care regiment that is not OTC!

Check out these posts as well:

Evaluating Your Skin.

 

Step 2: Spend wisely.

A Wrinkle In Time–My Botox Lines

10 Nov

While I’m waiting for a few experts to help edit some skin-care specific entries, I thought it’s about time to introduce my favorite pharmaceutical–Botox Cosmetic.  One in four women over the age of 30 is interested in learning more about Botox, so you are not alone!!!  Not only am I user of Botox, but I am also the President (of it’s fan club), and a provider of this fountain of youth!  I consider myself an expert of injection techniques, the product’s history and safety information.

Isn’t it Botulism:

No!  Botox, or onobotulonium toxin, is a protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and is considered a powerful neurotoxin.  When injected into the muscle in small doses, it has a relaxing effect.  Have you ever taken penicillin?  Did you know that it is derived from mold?  But it’s not mold.  All medications come from somewhere.  Both penicillin and Botox are pharmaceutical drugs, they both come from natural organisms, and they are both safe when used in a proper manor.

What will it feel like:

Most patient’s claim it hurts less than waxing.

Where does it go:

Botox is injected into the muscle, which is under the skin.  There are many different muscles in your face, and each have antagonist and agonist roles (push and pull).  In order to get rid of certain lines, an entire muscle group may need to be treated.

Are results immediate:

It takes 2-14 days to see the full result of Botox.

Will you look like plastic:

Botox is dose dependent, and results are based on the amount of product used.  Our office treats every client on an individual basis.  A minimum dose of Botox is used for each client to avoid the “plastic” look.  Please refer to the satisfaction survey diagrammed to the left.  Please also note that 9% of the population is never satisfied with anything.  Therefore I give Botox a 100% satisfaction guarantee, but I am slightly biased.  🙂

How long will it last:

Botox typically lasts 3-6 months, depending on the treatment dose and how your body responds.  If you choose to not continue treatment, your skin will go back to normal; however, when you decide you love it (which you will due to it’s 100% satisfaction rate), you should keep up on treatment when you see movement return.  The more you keep up on your Botox, the longer it lasts.  Why?  Think about when you go to the gym and you get really strong arms… and then you stop going and the muscle dies because you aren’t using it as much.  Same idea with your facial muscles.

Is it safe:

Botox is very safe when administered by a trained medical professional.  It has been used medicinally for over 50 years.  It would take over 300 times the dose used in cosmetics to be dangerous to your body.   The American Society of Plastic Surgeon’s logged Botox Cosmetic injections as the leading minimally invasive procedure for the last few years, with 5.4 million treatments last year, so somebody’s doing it (actually 5.4 million people are doing it!).  My client’s biggest complaint:  I wish I had done this sooner!

Botox for Migraines:

I bet you didn’t know you could use Botox for migraines!  Botox was FDA approved for Migraines on October 10, 2010. Eight out of 10 people found the number of headaches they had to decrease AT LEAST 30% and the severity of the headache to decrease by over 70% as well.  Studies show Botox not only helps with Migraines, but other types of severely painful headaches as well.  Also, Botox is non-addicting (technically) and non-habit forming like many migraine treatments are!  Yay Botox for migraines!

I’m sure you all have many more questions about the wonders of Botox, so stay tuned!

The Halo Effect

19 Oct

The idea in psychology/sociology that attractive people are seen as angelic and are therefore stereotyped with having angelic qualities and treated with positive enforcement of these “qualities.”

Studies have shown that attractive people achieve more in life, are generally happier, and have more self-confidence.

Quick Personal Story

About 2 years ago, I was dating this really good looking, smart guy and I really liked him.  And I let him treat me… not so nice.  On July 4th, after not returning multiple phone calls, I was out with my friends downtown, when we ran into each other.  Essentially he broke up with me on a pole outside of Dillon’s (a bar).  With glitter on his face.  Probably from making out with some girl.  His response:  “I was going to break up with you on Monday.”  Devastation.

Fast Forward 9 months.    I run into this boy again.  This time I have just had my lips done.  He kindly bought me drinks all night, and at the end of the night I said thank you, and good bye.

Did he feel bad?  Was it because I was hot?  Who knows, and who cares.  The fact of the matter was, I felt hot.  And confident.  AND best of all, I felt retribution for the way I was treated by this boy less than a year prior.

The Attractiveness Co-Effecient

Did I treat him better because he was good looking?  Probably.  Did he treat me better when I was better looking?  Definitely.  Was there some self-fulfilling prophecy factor involved?  Probably.  But like I said, I feel justified and that’s what counts.  We’re on a semi-friendship level to this day.

Beauty is not always advantageous though.  I have many experience where I’ve been perceived as mean, stupid, materialistic (ok this one is kind of true), and vain.  I have had people question my expertise and my skills in both medicine and business.  It is a difficult experience for me, as I have always excelled academically and am constantly reading and researching topics that inspire me.  I can only take these experience and use them to make me better as a person, and in my field of work.

The Hairdresser Effect

If the Halo Effect is the idea that good looking people are treated differently day to day, I would like to introduce my theory of the Hairdresser Effect.  When you look good, you feel good, and you reflect this confidence to others.  Every woman’s favorite place is the beauty salon.  FACT.  Why?  Because when you leave, you are at the height of feeling attractrive.  My hairdresser is the first person I go to when I’m sad (I would like to credit Lauren Cence, of Sylvestre Franc–thank you for making me the best blonde I can be! … and for all the free therapy sessions).  I aspire to have this effect on people, to bring physical beauty to aide a person to have the confidence to be themselves.  And be HAPPY with who they are.

Bottom Line

The bottom line here, beauty matters.  It effects how we feel about ourselves and how other treat us.  Whether it is self-fulfilling, whether it’s this Halo Effect, whether it’s right or wrong.  It doesn’t matter.  What matters is how YOU feel about yourself.  Striving for physical attractiveness is not a vain endeavor, but an expression of confidence and reflection of inner beauty.  Being attractive will lead you into a happier more successful life.

A Youthful Appearance

18 Oct

This being my area of expertise, it’s hard to know where to start, but first and foremost, I consider myself a bio-dork, so I’ll start there!

Biology of YouthUniversal

The biological purpose of reproduction creates attraction to a youthful appearance by both men and women.

Researches have found the female perception of beauty changes throughout the month (just like us woman to change our minds!).  Women typically prefer a mature, masculine looking man.  These characteristics include a heart-shaped face and small chin with full lips.

During menstruation, however, woman are typically more attracted to softer, more youthful features.  These include a small nose, large eyes, and defined cheekbones (which males find to be attractive characteristics for females).

Work, work, work! Cultural

Thanks to medical advancements, we’re living years longer, and thanks to the economy, we now have to work during those extra years!  The lines on our faces reflect the years of hard work, dedication, and stress from work and life in general.  And let’s face it, the depth of the lines are in direct proportion the difficulty of life experiences.  Although not technically visible, these experiences have a direct effect on our psychological traits as well.  Therefore, one could make the jump that an older appearance on the outside reflects negative traits on the inside (I’m not saying it’s right or it makes sense).

“I want to look the age I feel” -Personal

Yes, it is our culture to jump to conclusions from physical characteristics to psychological traits, making personal beauty to many a reflection of how they feel on the inside.

Yes, life makes us feel tired sometimes, but it’s also full of exciting events!  Graduations, marriages, reunions, divorce (hey, for some people it’s a good thing!), children, grandchildren!  All these things make us happy; they spark that joy we associate with being young and excited.  Is it wrong to want your face to reflect this youthful joy?


Youth, No Longer Wasted On the Young


Symmetry

10 Oct

The Biology of It All…

Among studies across the animal kingdom, the most important characteristic in for mating is symmetry and balance, and thus can be argued the most important “attractive” characteristic for us as well.  Symmetry reveals genetic diversity; the more heterozygous the individual, the more symmetry is noticed in the face.  This is important because of the ability for these individuals to resist disease and withstand environmental factors.

But remember… no face is perfectly symmetrical.

Etiology of Asymmetry (from Wikipedia.com)

Congenital defect

  • Facial hemi-trophy or hypertrophy of superfacial tissue , muscle & bone.
  • Mandibular Condylar hypoplasia due to intrauterine or birth trauma.
  • TMJ Ankylosis, the mandible moves to the affected side.
  • Mandibular body or ramus hyperplasia, the mandible moves to the unaffected side.

Traumatic

Zygomatic process fracture & followed infra orbital depression.

Inflammatory

Abscess – cellulitis – cyst

 Muscular

a- Atrophy of facial musculature following Bell’s palsy.

b- Hyperplasia of masseter muscle in clenching habit.

c- Patients using only one side in chewing

Salivary Glands

Inflammatory as mumps or neoplastic.

Neoplastic

Ameloblatoma – lipoma – osteoma

 
I read articles about dentistry when I was writing this. I started noticing (while watching hockey) how people who have had broken facial bones are less symmetrical and less physically attractive. Or maybe it’s because they don’t shave. Anyways… they at least up the sexy-ness factor through having gorgeous bodies.

 

Beauty Defined

28 Sep

What makes a person beautiful?

It is a combination of inner beauty (psychological factors) and outer beauty (physical attractiveness).  Beauty is defined with individual, cultural and universal standards which every single person desires to achieve.

Universally Beautiful

Throughout time and across cultures, there are several characteristics of physical attractiveness.  Boston or not, beauty is:

Boston Culture

Although we are ranked as one of the countries most intelligent cities, we don’t fare so well in the areas of physical attractiveness (or friendliness for that matter!).  It’s 2011 Boston!  You can be both smart AND beautiful.

Individual Ideals

We look in the mirror over 30 times a day focusing on “flaws” that do not fit our individual standard of beauty.  It doesn’t matter what anyone else thinks – not your best friend, not your husband, not your mother – if something bothers you, it is significant.  Our conservative culture makes it difficult to attain our individual goals in beauty.  We have questions, but don’t know where to seek answers.  So, we rely on our best feature – our intelligence – and go on the internet, or read magazines.

The Beauty Industry

We spend half our paychecks trying to look good, we invest so much hope and money in the “next best thing” to fix our appearance, and continuously feel let down.  Companies and products capitalizing off a basic human need is a 14.5 billion dollar industry, and as a nurse, reminds me of our healthcare system!  The best of contemporary science and medicine offers the ability for us to achieve outer beauty.  As a provider of both healthcare and aesthetics, and as a woman who idolizes Barbie (not just because she’s blonde) it is my individual goal to help educate about aesthetics in a way our culture Boston culture understands – through science! 

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