Tag Archives: Breast Augmentation

Will it hurt?

24 Nov

Pain is such an abstract and obscure concept. You can’t really define it. It has so many dimensions. In the hospital, we assess pain on a scale of either facial expression charts or numerically from 0-10. Zero being no pain, and 10 being the worst pain you’ve ever felt in your life. It is an individual experience; the numerical response to a stimulus can differ drastically from person to person. So, whether or not something will hurt is relative.

    Source: http://www.pamz.com

On a Scale of 0-10…

What’s the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced? First, a broken heart. That took a really long time to recover from… and I definitely still have scars! The second most painful thing I’ve ever endured is being in a car accident, which I also still have issues from. I’ve never gone through childbirth, never been divorced, still have both my parents, and never had a kidney stone. So my list has room to change. I’d like to point out that my list does not include Botox, Fillers, or my recent surgery. But that’s what this post is about. Do aesthetic procedures hurt as much as people think they will?

Beauty is Pain

We’ve all endured painful treatments in the name of beauty. Ever tweezed your eyebrows? Waxed your lip? Burned yourself with a curling iron? Stuck an eyelash wand in your eye? Walked more than a street block in stilettos? All painful, but relatable, every day examples of things women do in the name of beauty.

If you asked 100 women the same question, you’d get a 100 different answers. This is because women never have a “yes” or “no” answer. It’s always a story. So here’s a comparison story.

Q: How painful are stilettos?

A: Well, that depends.

  • How big are the stilettos
  • How long are you wearing them for
  • How far will you need to walk in them
  • Who makes them
  • How often do you wear stilettos
  • How often do you wear those particular stilettos (i.e. are they broken in)
  • What condition are your feet in (i.e. do you have any blisters)
  • What size are the stilettos vs. what size are your feet (i.e. does the shoe fit)
  • What are the road conditions for which you will be walking in them (i.e. changes in elevation)
  • What are the weather conditions for which you will be wearing them (i.e. rain or snow, inside or out)
  • Etc, ect, ect.

So, when you ask how badly something will hurt, there are many conditions which will change the outcome. It’s hard to explain the pain factor of beauty. The “Universal Pain Assessment Scale” does not really work when it comes to women and what they’re willing to endure. So… I decided to paint my own comparative scale. Because I love “Paint” (the computer program) and I love making stuff relatable.

The “LK Aesthetic Comparative Assessment Scale”

I’m not going to lie. This took me a long time to create, and it’s pretty scientific (although has no reliability or validity, it is merely my projections). This is how it works. Each treatment is rated in 3 dimensions on a scale of 1-5. Then those 3 numbers are added.

Chemical Peels

Laser Hair Removal


Laser on the Face



Eyeliner Tattoo


Botox


Fillers


Some fillers hurt more than others. The worst is the lips. I used that for the pain scale, but other areas hurt much less.

Tear Troughs    2

Cheeks        2

Marionette Lines    3

Naso-Labial Folds    3

Plastic Surgery

In all fairness… I think surgeries could be subcategorized. I heard liposuction isn’t really that bad. I guess it depends how well you are medicated too. Pain is relative.

I Hope this gave some perspective! Remember, this scale holds no scientific basis.

XOXO. LK.

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My Breast Augmentation: Day Before and Day of Surgery

24 Oct

**Disclaimer: I wrote this 2 days post-op and still medicated with narcotics. If anything I say makes no sense… there will be a retraction printed in the future. I just am so excited to write this!!!!

Getting Implants– Entry 1.

October 17: The Day Before

What does one do the day before surgery? I realized I would be out of commission for a good week. In a normal week, there is work and cleaning, and grocery shopping. Preparing for being out for a week, I needed to do extra cleaning, work, and grocery shopping. I had to make sure all my laundry was cleaned and put away. There was food in the refrigerator. My boyfriend tried to convince me I had to make up for a week’s worth of sex (oh boys!). All my meds had to be picked up. I had to pack for my friend’s house… the normal stuff. I also had to get my gel nail polish taken off, my hair extensions fixed, and my eyelash extensions filled (normal? I’m not sure…?).

I got home from work at 11:30, just as Aaron was getting home. I got in the shower, washed my hair, and had my last drink of water (no food or water after midnight). I hadn’t been scared or nervous all day. But I usually do have difficulty sleeping when I’m nervous. Aaron gave me a night-night cocktail (aka Nyquil and ibuprofen) and slept like a baby (not medically prescribed mind you—do not try this at home).

October 18: 5am

Ungodly hour. Normally the only time I make the exception to be awake this early is if:

  1. I’m still up partying from the night before (which hasn’t happened since my UMass Amherst days—I SWEAR……….)
  2. I’m leaving on a plane for Mexico with the Donohue’s (from Donohue’s Bar and Grill in Watertown which is the most fun bar EVER).
  3. I’M GOING TO GET MY BOOBS DONE!!!!

I threw up a zip up sweatshirt (I didn’t want to put on anything that would have to go over the head) and some sweat pants. Don’t forget, it’s difficult to put your arms up over your head post op. Then that age old question hit me. Do I wear underwear? I decided there was probably super special sexy hospital underwear to put on. So I skipped. (They did give me some super sexy briefs at the hospital as I expected.)

Don’t I look hot at 5am?

5:15 AM

I of course forgot to pick up my post op meds (which you should ALWAYS do before surgery). My awesome boyfriend took me to the 24 hour CVS to pick up my vicodin, oxycodone, and antibiotics.

6:00 AM

Caitlyn McGrath arrives in a Ford 950 (whichever the really, really big one is). Cait normally drives a Volkswagen. I’m all like, Cait, why do you have this ginormous vehicle? And she’s all like… Well I didn’t have gas in my car, so I took my boyfriends. So I’d like to give a shout out to Pat from the Sitchiute Fire Department for lending the getaway car. We did have to make a 3 point turn at one point. It was not pretty. (Female Quincy drivers = THE worst).

Are you PSYCHED?!?!” she asked me. I was like, Cait, it’s 5 o’clock in the morning. Please. Stop yelling. (I don’t even think she really was yelling).

Cait is one of the lead medical aestheticians at the office and is in Nursing School, so she got super top secret clearance to be in on my case. Like FBI style. I’m so glad she was there. She knew every doctor/nurse/surgical assistant that walked into my room. And confirmed with me that they were all THE best.

6:15 AM

My nurse Maureen comes in, does my vitals, asks all my medical history questions, and inserts my IV (perfectly on the first try might I add). I signed a bunch of papers and started to get a little nervous, but like that first day of school nervous. That excited, this is going to be awesome kind of nervous.

7:00 AM

The doctor arrived and marked my breasts for the incisions. Then the nice nurse anesthetist came in and gave me something to relax through my IV. I remember being wheeled into the OR room. 5. 4. 3. And see ya later. I was out for the next few hours.

Apparently I woke up at spoke to Caitlyn a little bit, but I definitely don’t remember that.


All bandaged up.


The bandages stay on for about 7 days. You can’t get them wet (i.e. no showering. Iiiiiiick).

2:30 PM

My friend Jen P. came and picked me up and drove me to my other friend Julie’s (when I say this surgery was a TEAM effort, I am not kidding!). Julie is an awesome recovery room nurse and she and I decided it would be best if I stayed with her for the first two days post op. I am SO glad I did.

Even with the meds I was on I was still in a good amount of pain. Julie had to bear hug assist me up off the couch (I couldn’t push up with my arms because it was too painful). She also helped me keep a medication schedule and made sure I got my meds every 3 hours. And last, and most embarrassingly, she helped me pull my pants up when I had to use the bathroom.

5:00 PM

My boyfriend came and brought me beautiful flowers and told me how much he loved me. Awwwwww. He also brought me his fleece because it smells like him and I’m a dork and it helped me sleep.


6:00 PM

The party reallllllyyyyy begins. Kathy Nash (owner of KN MedSpa in Natick) arrives. I am really lucky to have such great friends to take care of me, medicate me, dress me, and help me keep my mind off of the surgery. It is not uncommon to have feelings of being overwhelmed or depressed after surgery. My crew kept a close eye on me to make sure I was mentally and physically stable. Errrrr… baseline…. for me.

  • A Funny Nurse’s Note From the Girls –


Baci, D.O.G. wearing my A sized bra. Awwwww. He looks like such a tuff guy… in a bra.


What! We couldn’t let Baci D.O.G. have all the fun.

A little comparison was in order from old bras to new bras.

October 19

Feeling like a million bucks. Staid on my medication schedule. It’s important to do this for the first day or two post op because you don’t want to get behind with pain. It’s hard to catch up. But I was up walking around once an hour. Feeling pretty good. I know pain worries a lot of people, but at most I felt uncomfortable right before I needed my meds.

Julie took me to Corbu Salon in Cambridge so my friend Devon could wash my hair (felt soooo good!) while Julie got hers highlighted. Thank god for all my friends in the hair industry as well! I mean, I might not have been able to shower for a week, but at least my hair could look good!

My post-op follow up is 10/24. So expect another post about post-operative care shortly!

As of today, I am SO happy. I’ve waited years to do this, and it has been the ONLY thing that has ever bothered me about my body. It’s hard to feel comfortable in your own skin, but whatever helps you do it, then do it. Just don’t go overboard!

xoxo LK

Getting Implants– Entry 1

7 Sep

I’ve been working in Plastic Surgery for a few years, and I’ve never been under the knife. I finally made the decision to book a breast augmentation. This is my experience, from a patient point of view.

August 27, 2012

I guess I would consider this day an emotional roller coaster! I had just finished a brachioplasty with the plastic surgeon (as a surgical nurse) when I was called into his office. Long story short, surgery is booked for October 18.

My first reaction was obviously excitement. There may have been a point where I was jumping up and down… and clapping.

Of course, on this day, my mother was meeting my new boyfriend for the first time. Do I tell her? Do I tell my dad? Do I tell my boyfriend’s parents who have probably already read about it on facebook? Honestly, I’ve actually never questioned telling anybody anything I do (although, in hindsight I’ve questioned whether or not it was always appropriate); it was a really odd feeling! I figure, I’m a terrible liar, so I might as well just say it like it is:

“Mom, I’m getting a boob job.”

Things don’t really faze my mother at this point. There was a moment of déjà vu back to the night before my 18th birthday, when I told her I was getting a tattoo.

“How big?” she asked.

“Proportional” I answered. (I gave the wrong answer when I was 18, and I am fortunately not the owner of a GINORMOUS back tattoo, THANK GOD for my mother telling me to make it small!).

“It’s your body, whatever makes you happy.” Aw, mom!

It’s Your Body

Making the decision to undergo plastic surgery should never be anyone’s decision but your own. It should never be for a guy or under peer pressure of a friend. It is a major decision, and as with any surgery, it has risks. I’ve wanted to do this for years, but either I haven’t had the time or I haven’t had the money!

I want to be more proportional. I want my clothes to look good on (or off). And I don’t want to dread bathing suit season!

My reasons for doing this are healthy, and I am very happy with my decision.

August 9,2012 – My Consultation

Choosing size, shape, and style

There are a lot of options to consider when deciding on implants! The first question many ask is: “how big?” expecting an answer in cup size, I guess. But implants don’t come in cup size. They come in cc’s (cubic centimeters). In order to determine the size, shape, and style of implants that are best suitable, there are several things to consider:

  • Symmetry of your breasts
  • The width of your breasts in proportion to the chest wall
  • The characteristics of your breast tissue – how much tissue do you have? How much stretch do you have in your breast tissue?
  • Your goals and expectations for surgery
  • The location of the incision and the implant placement

The Age Old Question: Saline vs. Silicone

Saline

Silicone

Contents

Filled with sterile salt water.

Filled with soft, elastic gel.

May be pre-filled to a predetermined size, or filled at the time of surgery to allow for minor modifications in implant size (good for asymmetrical breasts).

Pre-filled and may require a longer incision for implant placement.

Consistency

Amount of fill affects the shape, firmness, and feel.

Feels and moves like natural tissue.

Risks

scar tissue, breast pain, infection, changes in nipple sensation, implant leakage or rupture.

same as saline.

Rippling

More likely

Less likely

Cost

Less expensive

More expensive

I chose silicone, because it is more natural looking and feeling.

Under the Muscle or Over?


The implant is placed in a pocket either directly behind the breast tissue (right) or underneath the pectoral muscle which is located between the breast tissue and chest wall.

I chose under the muscle.

Incisions, Incisions, Incisions?


An incision can be made either underneath the breast, just above the crease, around the lower edge of the areola or within the armpit.

One of the advantages of a saline-filled implant is that, because it is filled with saltwater after being inserted, only a small incision is needed. Often, an incision of less than one inch is made underneath the breast, just above the crease, where it is usually quite inconspicuous.

Another possible location for the incision is around the lower edge of the areola. A third alternative is to make a small incision within the armpit.

Once the incision is made, the surgeon creates a pocket into which the implant will be inserted, either under or over the muscle as previously discussed.

Smooth or Textured

The surface of the implant can be smooth or contoured. The contoured implants have little bumps on them (like gripping). They are teeny tiny. It’s hard to describe and the pictured don’t really help. But anyways, this keeps the implant exactly where it is placed.


smooth, round

textured, round

I choose textured.

Round or Oval Base

The base of the implant (or the back I guess you would call it when it’s inserted) can come in round or oval.

round

oval base (see how it’s wider)

We are still deciding this one. Leaning towards oval base.

Projection

The amount the implant sticks can be determined by the base to width ratio of the implant.

High Profile Implants

Have more projection per measurement of base diameter than a moderate profile breast implant. An added benefit of the high profile breast augmentation is that in order to create the profile, the side wall of the implant has more height, which may reduce visible rippling. These high profile breast implants will provide more anterior projection (front projection).

Moderate Profile (regular / standard)

These are the standard, creating a ‘normal’ profile. With a full and rounded look, this moderate profile breast implant adds a significant amount of dimension and volume to a woman’s breast. This could create a wider chest appearance, which would benefit those with a narrow chest.

Low Profile Implants

These breast implants have less projection per measurement of base diameter than a moderate profile breast implant.


Example:

200cc High Profile Implant (top in picture) is 9.8cm wide and 9.8cm tall. The projection is 4.9cm

210cc Moderate Profile Implant (bottom in picture) is 10cm wide and 11cm tall. The projection is 3.8cm.

Drawing not to scale. Sorry!

I chose moderate profile, again, because I want the most natural look.

Round or Contoured Implant Projection

Prior to Sientra’s new implant (more on Sientra below) the contoured implant eventually became more round due to the body’s muscle pulling on the silicone gel. The new “gummy bear” implant will keep it’s shape.

round shape

contoured

We are still discussing this as well, but we are probably going with contoured.

Breast Implant Manufacturers

Currently there are 3 companies that manufacture breast implants in the U.S. As of recent, a cohesive silicone gel implant manufactured by Sientra was approved by the FDA (after 8 years of clinical trials). I had heard of this hot new option in New Beauty Magazine (best magazine ever) a year or so ago. They have been nicknamed “gummy bear implants” because, like the candy, the implant has a rubbery consistency that holds its form well over time. This product is the most natural-looking breast shape, and lasts for many years.

The Sientra Implant has the lowest leak rate of all the implants currently approved. Even if the outer shell is ruptured, the silicone gel in the implant remains cohesive and doesn’t migrate to other parts of the body. (I would have tested this theory, but I’m not allowed to cut the implants in half at the office…)

The implant is the most natural looking. Because silicone gel is more cohesive, the risk of shell collapse producing a rippling effect seems to be lower. The implant is also fit to the person’s size and body type.

Less scar tissue
forms with this implant type. Capsular contracture is the medical term for scar tissue buildup and hardening around the implants – a condition that can be painful, and in severe cases, require surgery. The rate of scar tissue buildup appears to be much less with gummy bear implants.

I’ve basically been looking at breasts and reading about breast implants since the middle of August. (Is this what it feels like to think like a man?) Here are some sites I found interesting about Sientra’s new silicone implant (the second two are video’s).

http://www.sientra.com/

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/gummy-bear-breast-implants-future-breast-augmentation-surgery/story?id=16370362#.UEiTF2Hh-pg

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/09/gummy-bear-breast-implants_n_1413122.html

My Consultation Sizing


Before

492cc Implant

Before

492cc Implant


Do Whatever You Want, If It Makes You Happy. But First Take This Quiz.

31 Jan

The following quiz is from Joan River’s HILARIOUS book Men Are Stupid… And They Like Big Boobs.  Even if you are in no way, shape, or form planning on having any sort of procedures, this is still a must read!  (taken directly from page 12-14).  Anything in pink italic is my own interjections.  Because I always interject.

So You Think You’re Really, Really

Ready for Cosmetic Surgery?

Answer the following multiple-choice questions to find out if you’re emotionally prepared to make a big change.

1.  Spending money on myself…

A. is morally reprehensible!

B.  runs against everything my parents taught me.

C.  is fine.  What else should I spend it on?  My kids’ college education?

D.  is a touch call, but being happy is worth any price.

If you answered a., that spending money on yourself is morally wrong, then get back inside the convent, and pray for me because I’m clearly bound for hell.  Even Mel Gibson pays for his own SS uniforms.  If you answered c., remind yourself that spending money is good.

The correct answer is D., that there’s no better investment than your own confidence and happiness.

Joan couldn’t be more right!  Spending money on yourself is ok.  Spend wisely! 

2.  I want to make a change in my appearance because…

A.  my husband has been begging me to get implants since his secretary died.

B.  my friend told me every attractive woman has had something done.

C.  I’ve hated my nose for years, and I’m sick of walking into parties backwards.

D.  when I saw myself in a recent photo, I looked like my mother.

If you answered a. or b., you’re wrong.  Screw your boob-loving husband and peer-pressuring friend.  The one and only reason to get surgery or a non-invasive beauty procedure is for yourself.  If you think having work done will make you a happier, more confident, contented person, go for it.

If you answered d., you’re still wrong.  Those of you who have the fear that you’re turning into your mother, make a shrink appointment.  In the meantime, guess what?  Surgery won’t alter your genetic code.  Even if you’ve had a face lift, you’ll probably still look like your mother.  (This drives my daughter Melissa crazy.)

The correct response is c., because the motivation for change has to come from inside you.

The only reason you should do ANYTHING is for yourself.  I have SO many patients that tell me they don’t want their husband knowing, because they “wouldn’t understand.”  I get into countless debates, mostly with men – but some women, about how someone’s choice to do Botox is their personal preference, and because it’s a very safe procedure, there shouldn’t be as much controversy as there is!  Be supportive of your friend or spouse’s decision.  It’s THEIR body.

3.  The actual surgery will be…

A.  a snap.

B.  the first day of a completely different life.

C.  rough.  It’s major surgery and should be taken seriously.

D.  a bloody nightmare.  I don’t know how I let Joan Rivers talk me into this.

The correct answer is c.  Plastic surgery, from a blow lift to a butt lift, is major surgery and not to be taken lightly.  You have to be prepared to do whatever your doctor instructs you to do, before surgery and during the recovery.  You’re looking at up to a month of convalescence.  It’s not a walk in the park.  But, once the recovery is over, you’ll be thrilled you had the surgery.

The one thing you hear most from women who’ve had cosmetic intervention:

“I wish I’d done it sooner”

(This is also the biggest complaint I hear from women with Botox!)

4.   Self-Improvement is…

A.  selfish vanity.

B.  what we should all strive for throughout our lives, physically, emotionally, mentally.  Otherwise, why not just crawl under a rock?

C.  impossible.  I’m already as good as I’m ever going to get.

D.  embarrassing.  I’m loathe to reveal my insecurities and flaws to myself, let alone a stranger, especially an attractive doctor.

The correct answer is b.  Of course we should all strive to improve ourselves!  The pursuit of betterment is hardly selfish vanity!  Do we educate ourselves out of vanity?  Do we expose ourselves to culture to be selfish?  Physical improvement via cosmetic intervention is on a par with going to the gym, which most people consider to be masochistic but not vain.  Vanity is thinking you’re already perfect.  And if you’re perfect, put this book down and leave the rest of us humans alone.

** I would like to add, attractive doctors exist in Orthopedics (sports medicine) and on T.V. shows for the most part. 

5.  Beauty is…

A.  an unfair societal demand put on women so makeup companies, plastic surgeons, diet-pill manufacturers, and hair salons can stay in business and make tons of money.

B.  in the eyes of the beholder.  When I see a beautiful woman walking down the street, I’m so jealous I want to spit – in her eye.

C.  for the very young and/or the very rich.

D.  within  your grasp, a worthy goal, the way to feel good about yourself and stay vital in the world.

Beauty can be a source of a.) anger, b.) jealousy, and c.) envy.  You wouldn’t have those negative emotions if you felt beautiful yourself.  Imagine being free of jealous, envy, and anger-and not having first woken up dead and found yourself an angel.

Those who answered d. understand that beauty is within your grasp.  Now go out there and get some!

Ok, I know not everyone loves Joan as much as I do.  (We’re on a first name basis).  But, I think she has some very valid points, and I also think she looks the way she wants to, and she is happy with her results.  She makes millions a year off her surgically altered botox’d up face.  All the power to you Joan.  I hope some day the same is said about me! 

Joan Rivers’ Men Are Stupid… And They Like Big Boobs:  A Woman’s Guide to Beauty Through Plastic Surgery with Valerie Frankel

It’s absolutely hilarious, and discusses procedures from laser to lipo.  I highly recommend it.  I don’t agree with everything she says, but I think she gives mostly valid information!

Thinking about a NoseJob/Breast Aug/Lipo/Tummy Tuck? … Butt Implants?

15 Dec

I go with a lot of my clients to their consultations and watch a lot of procedures with a plastic surgeon.  My wonderful friend called me at 8 this morning to ask me what she should ask at her consult (apparently she forgot I am NOT a morning person).  I jumped out of bed though, because I remembered I had a lists!  I love lists ALMOST as much as I love white boards!

I know Plastic Surgery isn’t for everyone, but I think if you are contemplating it, you should be prepared from the beginning; starting with the right surgeon can make all the difference in the world!

Plastic Surgery:  Making the Best Decision

Brief important plastic surgeon qualifications

Please check out www.plasticsurgery.org to see if your surgeon is ASPS accredited.  If they are ASPS accredited you are in good hands.

Each ASPS member must meet the following:

  • At least five years of surgical training and a minimum of two years of plastic surgery training.
  • Board certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
  • Trained and experienced in all plastic surgery procedures, including breast, body, face and reconstruction.
  • Peer-reviewed for safety and ethical standards prior to attaining the honor of active membership.
  • Only operates in accredited facilities.

When making the choice:

  • Use your head not your heart in making the selection.
  • Bring before and after photos, if possible, to show what you want.
  • Research the doctor, call other patients for recommendations.
  • Get a recommendation from your bariatric surgeon.
  • Meet the doctor and get to know him or her; you trust yourself to his or her care, so you need to feel comfortable with the person.
  • Use the term “reconstructive surgery” with your insurance company, since “plastic surgery” is often considered to be “cosmetic” or “elective” and hence is not covered.

Questions to ask:

1.  Are you an ASPS member surgeon? If he or she answers “yes” you can rest assured that your surgeon is board certified in plastic surgery, has hospital privileges and only performs surgery in accredited facilities.
2.  Are you board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada?
3.  Do you have hospital privileges to perform this procedure?   If so, at what hospital? Is the surgical facility accredited?
4.  Am I a good candidate for this procedure?
5.  What will be expected of me to get optimal results?
6.  What are the risks involved with my procedure?
7.  Will I need to take time off work?  If so, how long?

What you should ask about the procedure

8.  What is the simplest and safest surgery to help me achieve my goals?
9.  How is the surgery performed?
10.  What is the expected length of operation?
11.  Are other options available?
12.  What results can I expect, and how long do the typical results last?
13.  Where will scars be located, and how noticeable will they be?

What you should ask about your surgeon’s experience

14.  How many times has the surgeon performed this procedure?
15.  How long has the surgeon been performing this procedure?
16.  How many times per year does the surgeon perform the procedure?
17.  How many patients have required re-operation or touch-ups?
18.  What complications may occur?
19.  How frequently do these complications occur?

What you should ask about logistical matters

20.  What preparation is required the day before and morning of surgery?
21.  Should my regular medications be taken on the morning of surgery?
22.  What time should I arrive at the surgery location?
23.  Should someone drive me?
24.  Should someone wait at the surgery location or come back later?

 

What should you ask about emergency plans

25.  What emergency plan and equipment are in place to provide for my needs in the event of an emergency?
26.  Are the surgeon and staff certified in Advances Cardiac Life Support? (ACLS)?
27.  Does the surgeon have admitting privileges at a local hospital should problems arise during my office surgery? (Call the hospital to confirm)
28.  How would I be transported to this facility?
29.  Has an adverse event ever occurred in the past?

What should you ask about the recovery process

30.  What kind of care will I require?
31.  When will I be able to go home? Is an overnight stay required, or is one available if I prefer?
32.  Who will attend me in the case of an overnight stay?
33.  Will I need someone to drive me home?
34.  If a problem arises after I go home, who answers calls after hours and on weekends?
35.  If I need to be seen after hours, where will this occur?

36.  If I need help in my home, is a private duty nurse available?  At what cost?

37.  Are any special garments, medications, or diets required during the recovery period?
38.  How much pain/swelling/bruising is to be expected? How long are these likely to last?
39.  How long does the entire healing process last?
40.  How many follow-up visits are necessary?
41.  Who performs the skin care/post-operative follow-up/suture removal?
42.  When can I wear makeup?
43.  When may I return to exercise/bathing/driving/normal activities/work?
44.  At what point will I feel comfortable in a social setting?
45.  What if I am dissatisfied with the results or with the degree of changes achieved?
46.  If touch-ups are necessary when would that be performed?

What about fees

47.  Does the cost depend on where my surgery is performed?
48.   Will I need to see another physician prior to surgery for examination or testing because of a preexisting medical condition?

49.  Who pays this cost? Will my regular family doctor suffice?
50.  If a complication causes me to be transported to a hospital or stay overnight, who pays for this additional cost?
51.  If I request multiple procedures, can they be performed at the same time? What are the cost savings?

52.  What options are available for payment?

53.  Does the office accept credit cards?
54.  Is a payment plan available to patients?
55.  What is the refund policy should I change my mind after paying in full?
56.  Is my surgery covered by my insurance plan?

After discussing all of the factors involved with your proposed procedure with the surgeon, you should have a sense of whether or not the surgeon is right to you.  Take note of and consider whether the surgeon:

  • Listen and understand your priorities, opinions, and requests?
  • Communicate concern, compassion, request and honesty?
  • Instill confidence in you?
  • Display confidence in his or her ability to care for you?
  • Seem distracted, or come across as arrogant or curt?
  • Seem patient and willing to spend time to answer all your questions and discuses your concerns?
  • Condescend; talk down or under estimate your intelligence?
  • Make eye contact or continually jot down notes in the chart as you spoke?
  • Display positive body language?
  • Confuse you or offer clear explanations?
  • Appear to be selling you the procedure?
  • Adequately discuss any preexisting medical conditions you might have?
  • Encourage your family to participate in the consultation and decision-making process?

Do you:

  • Feel that you have established forthright communication and a positive rapport with the surgeon?
  • Trust your life to this surgeon?
  • Feel the Surgeon is acting in your best interest?
Remember, Aesthetic Augmentation is no one’s decision but yours. 
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