Tag Archives: Filler

Lip Augmentation: Basic Information for Patients

4 Feb

Interested in Lip Augmentation?  Check out this video and learn the basics!

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Video

Introduction to Injectable Fillers

9 Nov

I touch upon the basics of what a filler is and the different families of filler products.

Video Blogging… It Starts…

4 Nov

Here’s my first video blog!

Peanut Head: Volume Loss at the Temples

29 Jul

I’d argue the most over looked sign of aging is loss of volume in the temple. As we age, the temples lose fat and begin to narrow, shifting the balance of the face downward. Volume loss here contributes to the appearance of drooping and sagging of the cheeks and eyes (see Structural Changes in the Aging Face for other changes).  It begins as early as in your 20’s. It is most notable in athletes who have very little fat on their bodies, I’ve found especially runners.

As you can see, the area of total volume loss is pretty big when you actually look at it. In order to achieve the youthful contour of the temple, a patient will require a lot of product here. Adding filler to the temple is easy and almost painless, but deciding what filler to use can be difficult, they all have pro’s and con’s.

Juvéderm

This is usually my first choice with patients. For some reason… people tend to be nervous about filling this area! The great thing about Juvéderm is that it’s disolvable. The bad thing about Juvéderm is… you need a lot of it to fill this area, and that can be expensive. I’ve found great results by diluting the product before injection. The patient can see the result immediately. It may not last as long this way, but it is a good starting point. Most people love the result and usually step up to Sculptra when they notice they need a “refill.”


Radiesse

I personally don’t use Radiesse in the temples. It always reminds me of the scene from the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills when Adrienne Malouff’s husband injects Taylor and she has this big bump in her temple and Adrienne goes “is it supposed to look like that?” Although you get more volume with Radiesse, you also have more of a chance for lumps in this area. It’s not as smooth as Juvéderm (which is literally defined as a smooth consistency gel). It’s just not my preference, but for extreme volume lost I can see it being more cost effective.


Sculptra

I personally have had Sculptra injected into my temples. Sculptra is not a filler, but a biostimulator. Over several weeks post injection it promotes collagen production. It may take more than one treatment (usually 1-3 vials 1-3 treatments) to achieve the desired result. This is the longest lasting, and most cost effective product if you consider the longevity, but up front can be expensive. If you are the type of patient who is doing multiple fillers at a time, you should probably step up to Sculptra.


Fat Transfer

Fat injections can also be used in the temples but are only cost effective if a large amount of volume is needed for the entire face. I recommend only allowing a plastic surgeon perform this procedure (although a nurse can do it in Massachusetts). The fat is harvested from another area of the body (usually the lower back) via liposuction and transferred to areas of volume loss in the face (usually not just the temple). There is a lot of swelling and bruising with this treatment and not all the fat will graft (stay alive after transfer). It is also an expensive and invasive procedure. This being said, it can yield great results for patients who really need it.


The Procedure

Numbing cream is applied to the temple. The product selected is mixed with lidocaine and deposited on the bone until achieving desired volume. There is very little pain associated with all injectable products. Bruising isn’t typical; however, there are many vessels in this area, so it can happen. Expected cost depends on the product selected, but expect to use at least 1-2 syringes during time of treatment.

Good luck!

More Belotero!

27 Feb

Belotero: The Buzz.

Belotero has been my #1 selling injectable since it has been on the market (September). It gets into the small little lines that no other product really can with the natural result that Belotero offers.

The procedure I do the most? Under the eyes! It literally takes 10 years off your face! I might not be able to take away sleepless nights and stress, but at least I can make it look like I did by improving Under Eye Circles and Bags! I’m so thrilled with this product I did my own under eyes (called the tear trough). December was so busy and stressful, I was looking really tired. I did my under eyes about a year ago with Juvéderm, but Belotero is much better designed product for this area (read why below).

Do you see how tired I look? (I hate sharing before pictures of myself with no makeup!)



A little numbing cream is put under the eye for about 20 minutes. Then the numbing cream is removed and the face is marked for anatomical landmarks. This is just how I mark the face. Other injectors might do it differently. I am also aware I need an eyelash fill REAL bad.


Looks so much better after!!! It didn’t bruise or hurt at all!



Look at my dark circles. They are TOTALLY gone. I swear I have NO advanced computer knowledge what-so-ever. These are straight off my phone!

Belotero vs. Juvéderm vs. Restylane

Why do I like Belotero under the eyes more than other Hyaluronic Acid (HA) products? Belo doesn’t have any hydrophilic effects (hydrophilic = attracts water molecules). Plus or minus a little bit of swelling, the correction looks the same the next day, the next week, and the next month.

Juvéderm and Restylane are also in the HA family, but have a hydrophilic effect. This means the product will take on water molecules after it is injected, giving the area treated more correction over the next few days to weeks. Great for your lips and cheeks. Not great in the ultra thin skin under the eye. When this area is over treated you will see a bump or a bluish hue from the product. It’s not pretty. But it can be dissolved!  Hyaluronidase; Just In Case: injectables for beginners..

I also like Belotero because the product is thinner, which means it can be deposited in more superficial areas with a smaller needle and less pokes! Yay!

**Remember though: It’s the right product for the right place for the right person! Discuss which product is right for you and why during a consultation!  For more general information on which product is right for you What Goes Where?

More Before and After Pictures


The above patient had 0.2cc of Belotero to her tear trough area. It was two injections. The patient stated she did not even feel it (topical numbing cream was used prior to injection). The patient experienced no bruising associated with the procedure.

The above patient is a good candidate for filler in this area because the dark circles under her eyes are accentuated by a shadowing effect from volume loss. By replacing volume, the skin of the eye and cheek become more continuous as opposed to separate.


The above patient had 0.3cc of Belotero to her tear trough area. Topical numbing cream was used prior to injection, and there was no pain associated with the treatment. The patient experienced minor bruising the day after the injection which was easily covered with make-up.

The above patient would be a good candidate for a blepharoplasty. Although there is a clear demarcation of her tear trough, and filler drastically improved the area, the root cause of the delineation is not so much volume loss as it is a herniated fat pad. This fat pad is supposed to cushion the eye as it sits in the eye socket. Numerous causes contribute to the pad “bulging” out.

Interested in learning more about blephs?  Read Why I Chose To Have an Eyelid Lift.

The above patient had 1cc (1 syringe) of Belotero to her superficial marionette lines with great improvement to the texture of her skin. Topical numbing cream was used. The patient did experience some minimal bruising the day after the procedure. She is very happy with the outcome.


XOXO, LK

Above picture:

2 months after my Belotero treatment

3 days into the annual Cutera Conference in Las Vegas (so, I haven’t slept in 3 days)

1 week post break-up with my boyfriend

And still looking refreshed! Thanks Belo! Qué Bella!
(that’s Spanish I think…)

Structural Changes in the Aging Face

3 Jan

Wrinkles and sun spots aren’t the only things we can expect to happen to our face as we age. There are many structural changes going on below the skins surface that contribute to an aging face that most people would never have noticed when they look in the mirror.

The young face on the left is round, contoured at the cheeks, and has a sharp jaw line (oh and hair and no wrinkles). The face on the right appears narrower, sunken, and droopy.

So besides the integrity of your skin, what else has changed?

Below the Skin

Bone Structure

Let’s start at the ground level. Your bones.

Your bones are always being built up and broken down. The rate at which the bone is broken down slowly starts to exceed the rate at which the bone is being built up as you age.

Bone changes cause:

  • a reduction in facial height
  • Increase in facial width and depth
  • The fat pad under the eye to bulge
  • A change in the shape and projection of the chin

Teeth

Injury and periodontal diseases result in loss of teeth, and it’s not like when you were young and the tooth fairy came and left you a dollar and a new tooth grew in (I hear with inflation it’s like $5 now!).

Loosing teeth affects the jaw bone and the muscles which attach to the jaw bone, which can result in make the face look narrower, hollow, and concave on profile.

Taking care of your teeth is super important, and not just for that pretty smile!

Fat Compartments

Collapsing fat compartments in the cheeks and temples reduce support to the overlying skin (side note: don’t worry! These fat cells go to other places… like your hips! j/k).

Splitting the face into thirds


Upper Third

Most people miss this when they look into the mirror at their aging face, but loss of fat in the temples results in the phenomenon I like to call “peanut head, ” which is also noticeable on super athletic people.

The presence of peanut head reflects a lack of support of the outer brow, which, along with loss of subcutaneous fat in the upper lid, causes the appearance of a droopy upper brow.

Blephroplasty anyone?  (Observing Surgery: Blepharoplasty.)

Middle Third

Eye sockets become wider and longer, resulting in a bulge of the cushiony fat pad that lies underneath the eye.

The cheeks start to flatten out, and the fat from the cheek descends to create a deep nasolabial fold.

The tear trough (area where eye skin and cheek skin meet) becomes noticeable. The middle third no longer has that fluid contour. This loss of fullness and form change causes shadowing in the trough, making a person appear to have dark circles, resulting in a tired appearance (just one of the things that causes dark circles).

Angles of the nose change, giving the appearance of increased length and the tip of the nose begins to droop.

Decrease of collagen and increase in tooth display at rest cause the upper lip to lengthen. Fun Fact: the upper lip can stretch by almost 4mm as you age.

(Stolen from another site…shhhh…) Image A shows a youthful face. Look at the contouring from the eye to the cheek. As you age, it can be convex like image B, which shows the fat pad bulging, or it can be concave like image C, making the eyes look hollow. Both B and C show a flat cheek when compared to Image A.

Lower Third

With all this stuff happening in the upper portions of the face, skin sags and starts to hang in the lower third. Adding insult to injury, the angle of the jaw changes, the jaw line, becomes less defined, and the chin shortens. Excess skin droops from the jaw line from gravity and loss of elasticity. Loss of ligament support in the jaw leads to the formation of jowls.

Even with droopy skin, the lower portion of the face starts to look smaller than the upper and middle third.

advancedskinwisdom.com a

(This image was also stolen).

What are your options?

Don’t worry. There are things you can do for volume loss! They do NOT include Oil of Olay, although the new commercial on tv claims it can (they lie).

Injections

For advanced volume loss, Sculptra is really the best injectable product. This product is a biostimulator; it works by stimulating your body’s own natural collagen. Results are the most natural of all the fillers, and the product lasts 2 years. I plan on writing a lot more about Sculptra, so stay tuned!

If you aren’t mentally or financially ready to jump into Sculptra, Radiesse is a wonderful thick, volumizing filler. It is usually my product of choice for cheek augmentation, naso-labial folds, and marionette lines.

For tear troughs, I LOVE Belotero (which is made by the same company as Radiesse). Filling this area literally takes ten years off your face, but remember, it is a very advanced procedure. Stick to a friend’s referral as to who to go to; I have seen a lot of over treated troughs!

For more help with fillers, check out What Goes Where?.

Surgical

Another option is fat transfer. I have assisted in several fat transfers; it is a very interesting procedure. If you are planning on liposuction, I highly suggest inquiring about fat transfer as well.

For sagging skin around the neck and jaw line, surgery is the only real option to date.

XOXO, old LK

(I found the ‘Age My Face’ Ap… yes… there’s an ap for that!)

Will it hurt?

24 Nov

Pain is such an abstract and obscure concept. You can’t really define it. It has so many dimensions. In the hospital, we assess pain on a scale of either facial expression charts or numerically from 0-10. Zero being no pain, and 10 being the worst pain you’ve ever felt in your life. It is an individual experience; the numerical response to a stimulus can differ drastically from person to person. So, whether or not something will hurt is relative.

    Source: http://www.pamz.com

On a Scale of 0-10…

What’s the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced? First, a broken heart. That took a really long time to recover from… and I definitely still have scars! The second most painful thing I’ve ever endured is being in a car accident, which I also still have issues from. I’ve never gone through childbirth, never been divorced, still have both my parents, and never had a kidney stone. So my list has room to change. I’d like to point out that my list does not include Botox, Fillers, or my recent surgery. But that’s what this post is about. Do aesthetic procedures hurt as much as people think they will?

Beauty is Pain

We’ve all endured painful treatments in the name of beauty. Ever tweezed your eyebrows? Waxed your lip? Burned yourself with a curling iron? Stuck an eyelash wand in your eye? Walked more than a street block in stilettos? All painful, but relatable, every day examples of things women do in the name of beauty.

If you asked 100 women the same question, you’d get a 100 different answers. This is because women never have a “yes” or “no” answer. It’s always a story. So here’s a comparison story.

Q: How painful are stilettos?

A: Well, that depends.

  • How big are the stilettos
  • How long are you wearing them for
  • How far will you need to walk in them
  • Who makes them
  • How often do you wear stilettos
  • How often do you wear those particular stilettos (i.e. are they broken in)
  • What condition are your feet in (i.e. do you have any blisters)
  • What size are the stilettos vs. what size are your feet (i.e. does the shoe fit)
  • What are the road conditions for which you will be walking in them (i.e. changes in elevation)
  • What are the weather conditions for which you will be wearing them (i.e. rain or snow, inside or out)
  • Etc, ect, ect.

So, when you ask how badly something will hurt, there are many conditions which will change the outcome. It’s hard to explain the pain factor of beauty. The “Universal Pain Assessment Scale” does not really work when it comes to women and what they’re willing to endure. So… I decided to paint my own comparative scale. Because I love “Paint” (the computer program) and I love making stuff relatable.

The “LK Aesthetic Comparative Assessment Scale”

I’m not going to lie. This took me a long time to create, and it’s pretty scientific (although has no reliability or validity, it is merely my projections). This is how it works. Each treatment is rated in 3 dimensions on a scale of 1-5. Then those 3 numbers are added.

Chemical Peels

Laser Hair Removal


Laser on the Face



Eyeliner Tattoo


Botox


Fillers


Some fillers hurt more than others. The worst is the lips. I used that for the pain scale, but other areas hurt much less.

Tear Troughs    2

Cheeks        2

Marionette Lines    3

Naso-Labial Folds    3

Plastic Surgery

In all fairness… I think surgeries could be subcategorized. I heard liposuction isn’t really that bad. I guess it depends how well you are medicated too. Pain is relative.

I Hope this gave some perspective! Remember, this scale holds no scientific basis.

XOXO. LK.

Belotero: The Buzz

18 Sep

I’ve been waiting to announce this for months!

Merz Aesthetics (the company that makes Radiesse) has released a new product: Belotero Balance. The product was FDA approved in November, 2011. My office was involved in clinical trials, so I (of course) got a sneak peak at the product, and have been anxiously awaiting it’s arrival.

Why am I so excited you ask? Well, first, I think Merz makes awesome products (Radiesse is my favorite to use!). Second, and most important, this product can go into vertical lip lines! That’s right. No more “smoker’s lines!” I have SO many clients who complain about “smoker’s lines” around their lips!

Prior to this product’s release, there were two ways to treat the vertical lip line: with Botox or with HA Fillers.

Botox


  • Some people like it, some people don’t. I’ve personally never had Botox injected in my lips (I have however had many, many syringes of Juvéderm), but I’ve been told it is a strange sensation. It feels weird to spit out your tooth paste, or use a straw, or kiss, because the muscle that is used for these things is “relaxed.” Obviously, you don’t want to relax it too much, or you’ll look like a stroke victim, so I’ve found it doesn’t last long in the lips.

Fillers (Juvéderm and Restylane)

  • As you can see from the picture below (this is a great example), by injecting product into the border of the lip (vermillion border), the vertical lip lines do visibly improve, but they are still there.

  • OR, you can have what I like to call “the monkey face effect” (I couldn’t find an excellent picture of this, but I’ve seen some real bad monkey faces. I would have tried to take a picture of this, but I’ve found people don’t respond well when you tell them they look like a monkey face from their filler. Or a cat face.)

Anyways, Back to Belo…

The Hyaluronic Family

Belotero is a hyaluronic acid injectable gel, like Juvéderm and Restylane. Belotero more easily integrates into the skin and adapts to facial contours than other HA’s because it is softer. This results in a more natural and subtle look (but may require more product in some areas). Belo is designed to treat superficial facial lines and moderate to severe wrinkles that are closer to the surface of the skin. Unlike Belo, fillers such as Juvéderm leave a bluish hue under the skin called the Tyndall Effect, when it is injected too superficially, like in vertical lip lines. Injections of Belo last up to 12 months, which is comparable to Juvéderm (Restylane lasts about 6 months—does anyone even use Restylane anymore? Anyone?).

Belotero is made of sugars which naturally occur in our skin. No allergy test is required, and treatment is very safe. Like with all injectables, bruising and swelling are always a possible. My friend Colleen who is a dental hygienist is going to hate me for saying this again, but, for those of you in Boston who don’t tell anyone you do this stuff (even though EVERYONE does it) the best excuse for bruising is a “dental appointment.”

For fine superficial folds/fine lines. Including:

  • Periorbital folds or “crow’s feet” (also referred to as Periorbital lines)
  • Perioral Lines (aka Smoker’s lines)
  • Tear troughs
  • Deep forehead lines

For medium wrinkles, moderate-to-deep folds, lip contouring, and facial contouring. Including:

  • Glabellar crease, or frown line (the line that forms between the eyebrows).
  • Nasolabial folds, or smile lines (from the edge of the nose to the corners of the mouth).
  • Mentolabial crease, or chin folds (horizontal line that forms across the middle of the chin).
  • Marionette lines (from the corners of the mouth to the chin and jawline).
  • Earlobes (which of course aren’t in my picture! Oops!)
  • Lips and philtrum (which is the area between the nose and the upper lip)

(Do you like my feather lashes? I love Halloween Eyelashes!)

The world of Aesthetic Medicine is always changing. New products are being developed as we speak. For the latest info on the best new technology, stay tuned! I’m psyched for my newly approved Sientra Silicone Breast Implants! One more month until surgery!!!!

XOXO, LK

What Goes Where?

4 Aug

Prior to 2002, there was one type of facial filler: collagen. Many products have been developed over the past ten years which have caused collagen to become obsolete. There are now multiple categories of fillers, all made of different materials. The products in these subcategories have properties which make them better in treating some signs of aging than other areas or other products. Remember, fillers are different than Botox (it’s not all just Botox!). So what goes where?

Hyaluronic Acid (HA’s)

Synthetic forms of hyaluronic acid (a sugar that your body naturally produces) include products like Juvéderm, Perlene and Restylane. HA’s increase fullness and enhance the viscosity of the naturally occurring hyaluronic acid in your body. Although it may cost a little more, Juvéderm is currently the longest lasting product (in some cases lasts twice as long, and therefore is worth the extra $100 or so per syringe). I have performed over 200 Juvéderm procedures, and have personally been injected with this product many times!

*note: My face is just a model, I haven’ had all this work done I swear! I just love “Paint.”

  • Best for superficial lines (not very deep, not folds).
  • They are used in areas where “plumpness” is desired (like your lips!)
  • They can be used in cheek augmentation, vertical lip lines, and nasolabial folds, but might not be the best product. Cheeks and Nasolabial folds typically require a lot of filler, and cost-effectiveness wise, this isn’t the product. But if you just need to fix a little sagging, it can be used in the cheeks. If you want to overpay for deep nasolabial folds, then this product also can be placed in this area.
  • Vertical Lip Lines are usually superficial, which would make Juvéderm a good product, HOWEVER, if it is not placed right, the result is a monkey face.

Tips on Hyaluronic Acid

  • When I’m filling lines in the glabella, I always administer a dose of Botox to the area 2 weeks before injecting Juvéderm. This allows me to inject directly into the line; it is easier to aim at a stationary target! How do you know if you will need Botox and Fillers? If you have a line in between your brows at rest (a “1”, “11”, or “111”) and you pull that line apart with your fingers, do you still see a crease in the skin? If yes, you need both, if no, Botox is enough.
  • I always apply numbing cream 20 minutes before injections.
  • I never inject too close to the outer rim of the eye (distal orbital rim), it usually irregularities in the contour of the face.
  • Injecting into the tear trough is a very advanced procedure. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen this area over filled (which looks TERRIBLE). My recommendation: it is better to under-fill and book a follow-up. This area requires a minimal amount of product, and my personal policy is to allow a client to come back at no charge if they require a small amount more (within reason).

Particulated Fillers

These products, like Radiesse and ArteFill, contain synthetic beads or particles in different liquid carriers. They last longer than HA’s, because the body doesn’t break them down as fast. They are also thicker than HA’s, which means they satisfy a larger area of volume loss. These products are injected deeper in the layers of skin (never superficially like HA’s are). Why? Because they’re made out of beads in liquid… and in superficial skin that would make bumps! This means they NEVER get injected into the tear troughs or into the lips. EVER. For very, very deep glabellar crease, Radiesse can be used (but usually an HA is a better choice).

  • These products are for moderate to severe volume loss. As you age, facial skeletal changes, general tissue volume loss, and the effects of gravity flatten out your cheeks. If you look at the contour of my face on right side of my face (your left), you will see how round my cheek is. I think you can see in this picture that the apples of my cheeks are round as well. A lot of women will look in the mirror at their nasolabial folds and want to go straight for filling only those, but that doesn’t give the youthful round shape back to the face. On some people I like to do cheek augmentation with Radiesse as well as nasolabial folds. I always do cheeks before folds, because the cheek bone is the scaffolding for the lower face skin. When you change that, the depth of the NL fold will also change. Always top to bottom, never bottom to top, when it comes to your face fillers! **When you have extra weight on your face, you keep the roundness. Skinny people have really flat cheeks when they age. HA. Take that skinny people.
  • The marionette lines, prejowel, and oral commissure are usually treated as one area that needs to be fixed. They’re kind of like vector components of each other (for all you Geometry dorks out there, *brushes shoulder off*).
  • Again, skeletal changes that occur as you age cause your chin to recess and along with volume loss, change the angles of your jaw and chin. This is another area a lot of people overlook when spending that quality time in the mirror pulling at their face in the “this is what I would look like if I had a face-lift” pose. Even if you do have a traditional facelift, you aren’t doing anything about the volume loss. This contributes to the unnatural look of a face-lift.
  • Radiesse and Juvéderm can be used in conjunction to fix contour irregularities in the nose.

I hope that cleared up the two main classes of fillers. It’s a lot of information!!! The next post will be about Sculptra, which gets grouped in with fillers… but this is already too long! Lol.

xoxo SPRAY TAN – O – REXIC LK

Everybody’s Doing It!

29 Jul

“My wife’s into that Botox Stuff” – weird guy on the cape trying to give me vodka. ????

Anyways, it seems like everybody’s into “that Botox stuff.” But no one will admit to it!!! What’s the deal people? I mean… I fully admit to being an addict. I love my Botox! I guess I’m a little on the young side (although my birthday is coming up July 31!! Yeah!). So who exactly is doing this “Botox stuff”? Here’s some excerpts from my business plan on the “consumer profile” (I wrote this in 2009, so… there is updated information… but… I haven’t updated my stuff. I HATE making graphs on the computer… but if you gave me some colored pens and a whiteboard I would be ALL over it!).

Consumers

A survey by the Aesthetic Cosmetic Surgery Education & Research Foundation (ASERF), 2009, found the typical patient “married, working mother between 41-55 years of age with a household income of under $100,000.” These women were also found to be “health-conscious,” exercising, and eating right. Nearly 7/10 of the responders regard Botox and dermal fillers as an important part of their aesthetic routine.

Smart, health-conscious women ahhhhh? That makes me happy.

Age Distribution

Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

12,000

371,501

1,256,608

734,751

182,098

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0

9,844

55,635

41,118

11,880

Hyaluronic Acid

3,919

168,629

604,262

420,069

116,159

I’m assuming any of these 18 and under year olds are using Botox for non-cosmetic use, or for correction of facial deformities. Or… they are on “Toddler’s and Tiara’s.”

Percentage totals of Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

0.5%

14.5%

41.1%

36.2%

7.7%

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0%

8.3%

47.0%

34.7%

10.0%

Hyaluronic Acid

0.3%

12.8%

46.0%

32.0%

8.8%

Gender

In a recent survey by RealSelf.com, of the people who would get cosmetic work, the percentage of men is climbing. Ya, it’s true! Men are vain too! And not just gays! I was sitting in a bar eating by myself (yea… I was banished from my dinner party…) and I met a couple from New York. They were so much fun! The husband and the wife did botox… and they’ve been together for 12 years. And they still liked each other. And other people (like me) had a blast talking to them. …You know me and my tangents. Anyways. Good looking people are happy and stay married longer. I’m not sure if it’s true or not… I actually made that up. But men really are doing the “botox stuff”!

Would Get Cosmetic Work:

18-34

35-44

45-54

55+

Men

64%

67%

64%

47%

Women

82%

82%

80%

71%

From 2008-2009, minimally-invasive procedures increased 2% in the male market (ASPS, 5). And I assure you, it’s not just gay men doing this! I have a pretty large percentage (ok… I have a few) straight men doing this “Botox Stuff.”

                                Source ASPS, 2010 (8, 10)

Location:

The Northeast Region charges the highest amount in fees in the minimally invasive cosmetics procedures industries.

According to 2009 Regional Distribution Data by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, New England holds 20% of the Botox market and 31% (the largest) of the soft-tissue filler market.

Percent of Total Procedures Performed by Region

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5
Botulinum Toxin

20%

14% 23% 15% 28%
Calcium Hydroxylapatite 35% 16% 20% 15% 15%
Hyaluronic acid 31% 12% 18% 8% 31%

Source: ASPS 2010 (15)

The Northeast Region has the highest percentage of filler procedures performed (we are Region 1). Midwest is the yellow region 2. Region 3 is light blue. Region 4 is greenish. Five is purple. Interestingly, the Noretheast and West Coast are comparable in the procedures performed. I wonder how much L.A. and New York skew that though. And Miami probably skews region 3. Just saying. Statistics are only as good as their interpretation.

Income level

Data collected by the ASPS in “Demographic Changes among Plastic Surgery Patients” demonstrates that income no longer plays a significant role in elective procedures (1). With the adjunct on patient financing options, the numbers continue to increase.

According to an Allergan Representative, the average income level for a Botox Cosmetic patient is $50,000 nationally.

Social Class

Middle to Upper Class due to income level.

Education

Education level has not shown to be a significant factor in market; however the consumer of the Northeastern market wants to be educated on products/procedures before undergoing them.

Ethnicity:

                Source: ASPS 2009 Cosmetic and Reconstructive Demographics

Most Commonly Requested Minimally-Invasive Procedures for Ethnic Patients

African-American

Asian-American

Hispanic

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Source: ASPS 2010 (17)

Boston Market

And I’m not talking about chicken. Finding this information was pretty difficult, but I think I know my market pretty well. If you are under 35, you are probably not thinking about Botox or fillers… but honestly you should be. Remember, volume loss starts at 25. Being preventative is super important, and will cost less and look the most natural in the long run. At the very least, please use medical grade skin care!

If you’re over 35, it’s a good idea to start with the area that bothers you most. Have a long consult with your injector. Work out a schedule/plan with your provider, and make sure you talk about prices! That plan should ALWAYS start with good skin care!!!

I know your mom might disagree… but…

If Everybody’s Doing It, Shouldn’t You Be Too?


xoxo,

LK

Ahhhh… Big Ange is getting the “Botox Stuff.” LOVE IT! (Ok… well maybe she’s not the best ambassador of the Botox Nation. When do I get a t.v. show?)

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