Tag Archives: hair

Glam Girls Go Camping Too!

18 Aug

So, I’m totally in love (no sillies, with someone besides myself!) and I went camping. This girl, right here. So… if you don’t know me… I’m the stilletto’s and fake hair type. Fully manicured. My friends and clients got a KICK out of me going camping. But, I did it, because you can do anything for a weekend and because my awesome boyfriend told me I could bring as many bags as I want and he will carry them. I considered that a challenge. So here goes.


I’m going on a Camping Trip and I’m bringing:


  • Airmattress
  • Aloe
  • Allergy medicine


  • Burberry Sunglasses
  • Bells (just in case of Bears)
  • Bug Spray (4 days = 4 cans)
  • Bikini’s
  • Batteries
  • Band aids
  • Boyfriend


  • Clothes (as you can see each outfit is individually packed in a ziplock bag, making getting dressed fast and easy)

  • Calamine lotion


  • Dry shampoo
  • Daisy (the dog) and a Duck (just kidding he was already in Maine)





  • Flannel Sheets


  • Gloves


  • Hair: Oh god, this was scary. Apparently, wearing your hair down is a bad idea, it will get dirtier faster. Also, apparently bandana’s are you friend. And braids. I like braids though.
    • Silk scarf for night
    • Headband
    • 2 hair ties
    • Bandana!!!!

  • Hat
  • Hydracortisone cream
  • Hookah


  • Ipod and Idock (what, even in the woods I like to dance!)


  • Jeans


  • lighter


  • Mirror


  • Nail file


  • Pillows (because one is never enough)


  • Raincoat


  • Sunblock (tinted)
  • Smores
  • Sleeping bag
  • Shoes:
    • Sneakers
    • Flip flops
    • Slippers


  • Toilet paper
  • Tweezers for ticks
  • Tylenol (because of the hangovers)
  • Towels
  • Toothbrush
  • toothpaste


  • Underwear
  • Umass Hoodies (or college sweatshirt of your choosing)


  • Wool socks
  • Waterhouse’s flashlight (Waterhouse is a friend of mine whom I stole a flashlight from.)
  • Wet naps
  • Wine (in the box. It’s going to be a long weekend… ok fine it was tequila… but wine sounds so much classier…)


  • Xanex (just in case)


It was a really fun weekend, and I can see why people enjoy camping. I did wind up in the lake with all my clothes on after a possible poison sumac encounter. It was pretty funny. I think I’ll stick to camping once a year.

Pictures courtesy of Lauren Coffey. Thanks Lauren!!


It’s good to be home and back in a Betsy (Johnson).





A Bride’s Guide

17 Mar

Every bride wants to look perfect on her special day, and that takes a lot of hard work and preparation (or so I hear…)… I thought I’d be a big help for all those brides (and their bridal parties!) with a little bit of information you might find helpful!

Actually… I think any time anyone attends a wedding they want to look good. Weddings = Pictures. And now-a-days, pictures – the good, the bad, and the ugly – wind up on Facebook! So if you’re at the age where you will be attending lots of weddings in the near future (i.e. my age) you might want to take some notes…


Spray Tan

Spray tan’s typically last 7-14 days.  If your thinking of spraying (which I highly recommend), do it as close to your big day as possible!  You can’t shower for 6 hours after a spray, and you can smell a little bit sugary post-spray, so keep this in mind.  For the best results, spray the day before. As it wears off, it can sometimes look a little patchy. Make sure you exfoliate prior to your appointment (and shave).

Also, I hear there is a new spray out, that has glitter in it (OMG RIGHT!), but it’s only good for 24 hours I think? Maybe someone else knows more about this? I would also like to note here, that if you are not the bride, you should NOT be shining. That’s rude.


A plain old facial can be done anywhere from a few days to a month before a special date. Healthy skin is essential for a beautiful face. I recommend everyone see an aesthetician and purchasing some products that will keep your skin healthy.

Weddings are super stressful, and your skin responds to stress. Facials will keep break-outs at bay, not only by cleaning your skin, but by giving you some quality relaxation time. Spa days are great to do with your friends, mother, and future mother in law!

*Note: if you are planning on doing Botox or fillers, a facial should be done either immediately before or 5 days after any facial treatments.

Chemical Peel

Degree of peeling can vary, so talk to the aesthetician performing your peel and be CLEAR if you have any wedding events (or any events for that matter) that you don’t want to be shedding for. ‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!.  For a real good, deep peel, expect about a week to two of down time. Trust me, it’s worth it.

Very Important:  moisturize often with a pharmaceutical or cosmeceutical grade product after a peel.  Many places have post-treatment kits.  Do NOT pick at your skin!  Stay out of the sun! Do not use Retin-A prior to or post treatment for about 7 days.


Waxing your brows or lip shouldn’t be done the day of an event.  The process can irritate your skin, leaving it a little red.  Icing the area helps.  Or an anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen.  Make sure to keep the area clean to keep bacteria out of your pores, and causing break outs.


Often done during the same time as a facial, and can cause some minor redness.  Protect your skin after this treatment. Again, stay out of the sun, and do not use Retin-A prior to or post treatment for 7 days.

Laser Skin Rejuvenation Treatments

Depending on the laser, and the treatment, there can be some downtime with this (discoloration and flaking), anywhere from a day to a week.  Ask your practitioner what to expect with the treatment you are receiving.  These treatments really make your skin look great!  Never heard of laser skin rejuvenation?  There will be blog posts to come!

Teeth Whitening

It depends on the number of treatments you will need to decide when you should start. Some treatments take a few sessions, some are one and done. Go for a consult. At the very least, do the Crest White Strips.

Long Lashes

A lot of brides ask me about eye-lash extensions. Although a little expensive, they look great for a wedding.  They should be done about a week before your big event.  They take some getting used to! Lovely Lashes!. They also don’t last very long… usually about a month, so don’t do them too soon unless you are going to keep up on them. If you are having your make-up professionally done, the make-up artist will probably offer you some sort of fake-eyelash. If you are doing your own make-up and you want that lashed out look, practice a few times before the big day. I am a master of the strip lash… but it took me about a year to perfect my technique!

Minimally Invasive Procedures

These can be tricky to time.  If you are planning on doing any non-invasive procedures, they should be done either immediately before Botox and Fillers, or 5 days after.  This is because you don’t want Botox to travel into the wrong muscle group, or fillers to be moved into the wrong area.  Use good judgment with timing your treatments!

A lot of women do Botox and fillers before a big wedding!

Check out this article: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/fashion/24skin.html?pagewanted=all

(I’m the bridesmaid all the way to the left. I would like to add a disclaimer: The bride here is naturally beautiful. And has not let me tempt her into Botox—yet).


If you are new to Botox, I suggest trying it out 4-6 months prior to the wedding date for a couple of reasons. First, this way you can decide if you like it (which you will, but I still recommend trying it). Second, Botox is a dose dependant medication (your results depend on how large or small a dose you receive). Six months gives you plenty of time to work out with your injector the perfect dose for you! Last, you will not be able to look angry for 3-6 months. This might be helpful to any Bridezilla’s out there. So, when you are in witch mode, at least you won’t look like it. J

If you don’t have six months to do a trial run, if you are a Botox Pro, or if you just want to go for it, you should have your treatment AT LEAST 1 month prior to the big day, and NO MORE than 2 months prior. Anything more than 2 months, it might start wearing off, anything less than a month you might not have the result you desire.

Another interesting use of Botox with Brides: It is becoming popular to be treated for hyperhydrosis (sweating) in the underarm. I recommend this to brides who will be getting married outside in 100 degree weather. Sweating profusely is pretty gross. You’re already going to be nervous, and when you add your layers of dress (which I’m sure is not air conditioned), and all the dancing you’re going to do… might be a good idea. Plus, you didn’t spend all that money on a dress to have pit-stains on it. This procedure requires a pretty big dose of Botox, and is therefore pretty expensive. It’s not for every bride.

(Remember don’t go overboard either!)

Fillers (Radiesse, Juvéderm… Perlene, Restyline, ect. ect.)

Depending on the area of injection, there can be some minor bruising (or major depending on the injector).  Invest in some Arnica cream, and expect the worst (2 weeks).  Cheek augmentation bruises the least, while lip augmentation and nasal labial folds tend to bruise the most.  Gosh, I hate it when I have dental work 😉 The average bruise lasts a few days.

Usually older brides are doing facial fillers, while younger brides might want to plump their lips.

As for the rest of the wedding participants, the mothers of the bride and groom are usually also very interested in fillers (and Botox). After all, they have been looking forward to this day since the days BEFORE their children gave them premature wrinkles. Whether she is interested in a facial or Botox treatment, moms deserve to be asked “is this your sister?”

Things to Do 6 Months or More before a Wedding (or wait until after):

–  Bioenhancers like Sculptra Aesthetic (it can take up to 6 weeks to see a difference)

–  Plastic Surgery. Remember that crazy reality show on TV that brides were competing with each other trying to win plastic surgery procedures so they could be perfect for their big day? Those women were … appalling. Plastic surgery should never be taken lightly. Or have a competitive reality show. Leave competitive reality to “Survivor!”

–  Changing your hair color or cutting it short (stick to what you know looks good on you!)

Hair Products by Angel Boston

2 Jan

Hair products are some of the most important products a woman should own. There are a few things you can’t be cheap on – good make up, botox, lingerie and hair products.  Products in the drug stores are cheap in every meaning of the word “cheap.”  The shampoos will strip your color making your hair color fade faster and the conditioners will build up product junk on your hair.  I strongly suggest you ask your stylist for recommendations. Most salons give a minimal commission percentage or none at all which means your stylist will recommend a good product without trying to rip you off.  Most salons carry high end and lower end products as well, to appeal to all aspect of their clients. Not everyone wants to buy a $45 dollar bottle of shampoo. Big names in the hair care industry are Kérastase, Wella, L’Oreal, Goldwell, Matrix, Redken. Although these are big names it doesn’t always mean they would be the best for you. If you go to the hairdresser and you get your hair color or highlighted, it’s extremely important you use a salon sold shampoo and conditioner. Why spend money on coloring your hair and not spend money on taking care of your color you just had done?

Styling products

If you have thin, fine hair or thick, medium-course hair, it can make the world of difference when styling your hair. Finding a product that works best for you can be discouraging, but don’t give up. Ask your friends that have similar hair to yours for recommendations.

Everyone who blow drys, flat irons or curls their hair should use some sort of heat protection. Different brands make different versions, and I suggest looking for a “thermal” heat protection spray. Make sure its dry before flat ironing or curling it you don’t want to burn your hair.

If you have frizzy hair, the density of your hair determines what you should use. Fine to normal hair with frizz you might want to use light spray or a light smoothing cream. Either way, you’re going to have to blowdry your hair to help smooth the frizz down.  While blow drying, don’t be a wild woman.  Take a paddle brush and have the air blowdry in one direction. The direction of the brush going down your hair. It’s always good if you can use the products your stylists are using; they can give you recommendations on how to work the product for your hair.

 Where you buy your products matters.

Now when you see products inside TJ MAX, Marshalls, Ocean State Job Lot and even name brands inside of CVS there is a reason. Hair care products have an expiration date, like everything else if it sits on the shelf for so long is it still good? Name brand hair care companies will sell to discount stores if product has been sitting in the warehouse for too long. Distributors of products could sell it to the discount stores too if they find it sitting their the warehouse.  At any point in time, the company can make the choice to sell the product to discount stores.  Why you ask?  The answer is to make money. Just because you find Kérastase at your local CVS doesn’t mean the brand is less good then before you saw it there, it only means the that product inside CVS might be expired or was damaged in some way. You can’t put your full trust into the products and expect the same results as if you bought them inside a salon. If you’re interested in trying them go right ahead the likeliness of your hair burning off and falling out from using an expired product is less but just know… cheap products are NOT good for your hair.

Switch it up, and Share.

Last of all don’t marry a product. It’s good to switch between different brands of shampoo, conditioners and styling products. This way you hair will not get used to the product and stop working. It’s good to experiment with products, borrow your girlfriends products and let her borrow yours. You might find that some of your friends have extreme hair regiment, others might not. If you need help you can always turn to youtube many people have posted how to style hair better, using products. Its all a matter of finding what works best for you.

Good luck and remember there is never an excuse for bad hair unless he made you breakfast in bed 😉

I wouldn’t be a Barbie Doll if I didn’t have Fake

12 Dec


And you thought I was going to say “boobs.”  Not yet. 

I’ve had lots of different types of fake hair.  Lots.  Here’s a lil info written by myself and Mike Manzo (@MikeyManzo) of Michael O’Rourke’s “Rock Your Hair.”  (He rocks my life).

In the Beginning…

Picture from the Beginning

The first time I had extensions they were clips.  And it was love at first site.


These can be purchases for between $70-$100 at Sally’s Beauty Supply.  Make sure you get real human hair, and ask the people who work there to help you match it.  You don’t want to look like you got your weave at a mall cart.  They’re easy to apply, but take some practice.  By teasing the root of your hair, they stay in better.  Ask your hairdresser for some guidance!  They can be curled and flat ironed (I recommend doing this BEFORE you put them in).  Make sure you take these clips out before you sleep… mine make me break out.  The best way to clean these is with dry shampoo (I love Bombshell).  You should wash them every once and a while though with real shampoo.

Weave (Swing Wefts)

Swing Weft

My girl Ava did some very interesting techniques with my hair (microbeading, bonding… ect).  But my first step up from the clip-ins was as a model for Ava’s new technique with wire (like fishing wire… in fact… I think we went to Target and bought fishing wire).  She wired wefts of fake hair into my natural hair.  It looked awesome down, but was hard to put up (I only wear my hair up at the gym anyways).  The hair was totally re-usable.  Ava was awesome and gave me an hour long lecture on how to take care of my new hair.  I was so excited I think I paid attention to half of it. 🙂 I think this counts as white-girl weave?

Taped Wefts

Oh boy, did I have a bad experience with this one.  Mark from Dellaria’s in Newton convinced me they were the best thing.  Guys a great salesman.  But a horrible hairdresser.  My friend Nikki and I both got the extensions.  We both hated them.  You could see tape tracks in the hair.  Taking them out was a dirty gluey mess too.  Don’t Do It.  I’d like to thank Ava here for fixing this mess. Oh, not only did they look awful, but you couldn’t die them easily.  Bad for someone like me who highlights AND lowlights.

**No pictures.  Sorry.  I wore a hat most of the time during this phase!

Went back to clip ins about here.  Added some chemical free color.

A splash of color for concert going.

After my tape debacle, I went back to the clip-ins.  Had to let my hair recover.  It was around this time where my business was taking off in Newton Center, and I realized I couldn’t have fun funky hair anymore.  Or could I…

Red, blue, green, pink… clips from Sally’s for $3.99.

Whatever you do though… don’t flat iron or attempt to curl these.  They are synthetic and will melt.  And it smells.  Bad. 🙂

Next it was time for some Classic Bondage.

Classic Bonded Extensions

When I was ready to take the financial plunge and get real extensions, I had classic bonded extensions.  A tiny iron is used to melt the bond as it lies against your hair, which the stylist rolls until it cools and hardens with your own hair locked inside.  It takes FOREVER.  That’s why it’s so expensive. Accidental contact with a curling or flat iron could melt the bond, causing two to stick together or even to slip out of the hair. Removal requires application of a solvent, which softens the bond so the stylist can loosen it and slide it off (like the tape wefts).  Also, as your natural hair grows out… it can get a lil ratty looking.  And by ratty I mean dread-y.


Straight from the bag (ie, i need to flat iron the layers together--pic pending)

This is the latest and the greatest. This method is one of the longest and safest for your natural hair.  Strands can be customized to different sizes for the most personalized fit.  A small bead is threadedaround a tiny section of your hair and a strand of extension.  The tube is then flattened with a plier-type looking thing, holding the two together.  It is perfect for those who like to highlight and lowlight (like me!).  There is no glue or adhesive, so it doesn’t ruin your natural hair when they are removed.  Removal is quick and easy with Microtubes. The now-flat tubes are popped back to their original shape and slipped right off.

Things I’ve never done… but you should know about.

Heat-Free Protein Bonds

These are the smallest fusion points available and also the hardest, yet they are as flat as a piece of paper. This makes Heat-Free Protein Bonds ideal for fine hair, because they are the least likely to cause visible bumps or be felt when running a hand over the hair.

What sets them apart from the classic protein bond is that they are applied using ultra-sonic vibration to soften them as they are attached.  This means that there is no heat applied to the hair at any time, and that it would require a much higher degree of heat to melt or damage these bonds. Blow-drying and irons are of little or no concern.

Shrink Tubes This newer technology uses a clear plastic tube to attach your new hair, and is the option which allows the most hair to be added. Your hair is threaded through the tube just like it is with the microbeading, but in this case the plastic tube is heated until it shrinks to half its original size, tightly gripping the extension and your hair together.

There is room for two extensions to be sealed into each tube, if your own hair’s root is thick and strong enough to anchor that. These are great for creating a “lion’s mane” type of look, or for curly hair.

Sewn-In Wefts AKA “weave”! Tried and true, sewn-in extensions have been done longer than any of the methods above. They are often more cost-effective, but can be heavy and even painful when first applied.  The hair can be re-used for many cycles, but can be difficult to blend with layered looks.

In Conclusion…

It’s always a good idea to talk to your hairdresser before spending money on extensions, and it’s also a good idea not to go cheap.  If your salon doesn’t have a stylist who does extensions, ask who they recommend.  It’s ok to schedule consultations with a few salons before choosing a stylist and extension method. This consultation should be free and take 15-30 minutes. You should be shown hair samples, color choices, and examples of the stylist’s work. Don’t be afraid to ask questions!


Hairdresser Terms You Should Know!

21 Oct

I needed a haircut.  Bad.  Split End City!  Fortunately for me, I have an office in a Salon/Spa in Peabody!  Sitting in a new chair is always scary.  Our hair is very important to us!

I sat down, and said, “do whatever you want.”  She then handed me an article from Women’s Home Journal, October 2011.  I love articles.

Uncertain terms you give your hairdressers:

  1. Layers:  If you’re okay with adding movement but don’t like a choppy look, tell your stylist you’d like to keep the density of your hair.  Ask your stylist where the shortest layers will start and where the longest layers will finish.
  2. Bangs:  They can be anything from a think fringe to just a few strands swept across the forehead.  Specify length, width, weight, and angles.  I was talking into baby bangs once… also referred to as slow bangs… because they take FOREVER to grow back.
  3. Auburn:  Tends to suggest brown undertones to professionals, but many people envision something reddish.  The term “chestnut” causes the pros to think reddish, and the client to think rich brown.  I think Auburn as a purple undertone and chestnut as brown, and red… I would never think of in my hair personally.
  4. Ashy:  Client thinks dull or brassy, pro think subtly whitish.  The pro often adds warm or gold tones, which the client didn’t want.  Being“bleach blonde” for years… I actually did know the difference on this one!
  5. Brassy: most think “not pretty” or “dull”, but it actually refers to a metallic look.  I think of the greenish hue of a bad die job after coming out of the pool.
  6. Trim:  A standard trim gets rid of dead ends.  If you’re good at you’re upkeep (every 6 weeks or so) this could be a centimeter.  If you go every six months… it could be an inch or two.
  7. Lightening:  Anywhere from brightening to bleaching.  If you’re blonde, discuss “golden vs. pale” and dark “warm caramel vs. neutral brown”
  8. Texture:  Has a lot of different meanings.  From a natural wave to a full-on Farrah, this is important to be clear with.
  9. Volume:   A little goes a long way… (but in my opinion a lot is better!).  If you’re looking for a little lift at the root, or all-over volume, you should specify.  Or you could wind up with a mushroom cut.  Ask your stylist to teach you how to tease.  I like to wear my hair “Texas-style,” which to me is big!  (People from Texas do not actually wear their hair like this).
  10. Whatever you think is best:  Granting creative freedom without direction… not a great idea.  Remember, beauty is a personal, cultural, and universal perception.  Stylists are often culturally edgy and trendy (which is what I LOVE about them).  If I had my way, we’d all have huge lips, because personally, I love this look.  But does everyone want to look like a duck?  No.  (Not all lip augmentations results in the duck look either!).

With any beauty professional, make sure you are clear with what YOU think is beautiful.  I love my big Texas hair and Barbie bangs.  Thank you Michelle!

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