Tag Archives: skin care
Video

High School Reunion: Look Better than You Ever Have!

12 Aug

or at least look like your Facebook photos!

image

Ok, so I haven’t yet gone to any of my reunions… I run into people from my High School every now and again (you know… While I’m Botoxing them in my office….).  It is always great to catch up with the people who knew you when… Unless you don’t like them.  Then it’s great to look better then they do.

As as for the ex-boyfriend factor… Personally, I ran into one of my high school ex’s recently… Ehhhh what was I thinking?!?!?!!!!!!  (Dad, you were right about all my boyfriends!).  Even so, it can’t hurt to look uber attractive at a big reunion.  I just picture Romy and Michelle… Inventing post-it notes.  Ugh… And that AWEFUL football player.  Insert theme music:  time after time.  Love that song.  Sorry… I digress!

A reunion is as good a reason as any to want to look good.  Feeling good about yourself physically boosts your positive self-image and brings out an all-around better you!  And what could be more attractive then that?

So get pumped, start that diet, buy some AMahZing shoes, check out my video, and make them jealous.  Or just have fun… 🙂

VBlog Reunion

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Video

Botox 101

4 Nov

An introduction to Botox. What it is and what it isn’t.

Video Blogging… It Starts…

4 Nov

Here’s my first video blog!

Will it hurt?

24 Nov

Pain is such an abstract and obscure concept. You can’t really define it. It has so many dimensions. In the hospital, we assess pain on a scale of either facial expression charts or numerically from 0-10. Zero being no pain, and 10 being the worst pain you’ve ever felt in your life. It is an individual experience; the numerical response to a stimulus can differ drastically from person to person. So, whether or not something will hurt is relative.

    Source: http://www.pamz.com

On a Scale of 0-10…

What’s the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced? First, a broken heart. That took a really long time to recover from… and I definitely still have scars! The second most painful thing I’ve ever endured is being in a car accident, which I also still have issues from. I’ve never gone through childbirth, never been divorced, still have both my parents, and never had a kidney stone. So my list has room to change. I’d like to point out that my list does not include Botox, Fillers, or my recent surgery. But that’s what this post is about. Do aesthetic procedures hurt as much as people think they will?

Beauty is Pain

We’ve all endured painful treatments in the name of beauty. Ever tweezed your eyebrows? Waxed your lip? Burned yourself with a curling iron? Stuck an eyelash wand in your eye? Walked more than a street block in stilettos? All painful, but relatable, every day examples of things women do in the name of beauty.

If you asked 100 women the same question, you’d get a 100 different answers. This is because women never have a “yes” or “no” answer. It’s always a story. So here’s a comparison story.

Q: How painful are stilettos?

A: Well, that depends.

  • How big are the stilettos
  • How long are you wearing them for
  • How far will you need to walk in them
  • Who makes them
  • How often do you wear stilettos
  • How often do you wear those particular stilettos (i.e. are they broken in)
  • What condition are your feet in (i.e. do you have any blisters)
  • What size are the stilettos vs. what size are your feet (i.e. does the shoe fit)
  • What are the road conditions for which you will be walking in them (i.e. changes in elevation)
  • What are the weather conditions for which you will be wearing them (i.e. rain or snow, inside or out)
  • Etc, ect, ect.

So, when you ask how badly something will hurt, there are many conditions which will change the outcome. It’s hard to explain the pain factor of beauty. The “Universal Pain Assessment Scale” does not really work when it comes to women and what they’re willing to endure. So… I decided to paint my own comparative scale. Because I love “Paint” (the computer program) and I love making stuff relatable.

The “LK Aesthetic Comparative Assessment Scale”

I’m not going to lie. This took me a long time to create, and it’s pretty scientific (although has no reliability or validity, it is merely my projections). This is how it works. Each treatment is rated in 3 dimensions on a scale of 1-5. Then those 3 numbers are added.

Chemical Peels

Laser Hair Removal


Laser on the Face



Eyeliner Tattoo


Botox


Fillers


Some fillers hurt more than others. The worst is the lips. I used that for the pain scale, but other areas hurt much less.

Tear Troughs    2

Cheeks        2

Marionette Lines    3

Naso-Labial Folds    3

Plastic Surgery

In all fairness… I think surgeries could be subcategorized. I heard liposuction isn’t really that bad. I guess it depends how well you are medicated too. Pain is relative.

I Hope this gave some perspective! Remember, this scale holds no scientific basis.

XOXO. LK.

Safety during Pregnancy: What You Should and Shouldn’t Include In Your Beauty Regiment

6 Sep

It seems like it’s in the water with co-workers and friends (as evidenced by the three pregnant ladies to the left from Sylvestre Franc). I’ve had a lot of questions about what is and isn’t safe to do when you’re pregnant in regards to skin care products, laser, and injectables. It is understandable that women want to look their best during this time and hormonal changes during pregnancy can sometimes result in acne, unwanted hair growth, melasma and other skin problems. So what is safe to use and what isn’t?

Not surprisingly (to me anyways), there really is not a lot of information on product safety during pregnancy. The FDA rates products on their risks during pregnancy as follows:

Rating Definition

A

Controlled Studies Show No Risk.  Studies in pregnant women show the medication causes no increased risk to the fetus during pregnancy.

B

No Evidence of Risk In Humans.  Studies in pregnant women have not shown increased risk of fetal abnormalities despite adverse findings in animals or in the absence of adequate human studies, animal studies show no increased fetal risk.

C

Risk Cannot Be Ruled Out.  Studies are unavailable and animal studies have shown a risk to the fetus or are also lacking. There is a chance of fetal harm if taken during pregnancy but the potential benefits may outweigh the potential harm.

D

Positive Evidence Of Risk. Studies in pregnant women have demonstrated a risk to the fetus. However, the benefits of therapy may outweigh the potential risk such as in life-threatening situations.

X

Contraindicated In Pregnancy. Studies in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. The use of the product is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant.

Skin Care Products

Most skin care products fall into the Class C category; however, some products are recommended by doctors not to be used during pregnancy (although there is not enough evidence for or against them).


Not Recommended:

  • Retinoids
    • In A Practical Guide to Dermatological Drug Use in Pregnancy (Zip, MD, FRCPC) category B topical such as erythromycin, clindamycin, and benzoyl peroxide were recommended over topical tretinoin. This study states reports of congenital malformations in infants whose mothers used tretinoin during the first trimester.
    • This ingredient is found in anti-aging products such as moisturizers, and acne products.
    • Chemically a form of vitamin A, which in high doses can cause birth defects.
    • Oral retinoids, such as isotretinoin (Accutane, an acne treatment), are known to cause birth defects.


  • Beta Hydroxy acids (Salicylic Acid)
    • Ingredients used for their exfoliating and acne-treating properties. They penetrate deep inside the pores and clean out excess oil and dead skin cells that can clog pores and cause acne, blackheads and dull-looking skin.
    • High doses of the acid in its oral form have been shown in studies to cause complications and birth defects.
    • Small amounts applied topically are considered safe (over the counter face wash for example), but peels containing Salicylic Acid are not considered safe when pregnant.

  • Hydroquinone
    • Clinically used for pigmentation for conditions such as melasma, and it is used cosmetically as a skin-whitening agent. Although a large percentage of this topical agent is systemically absorbed, the use during pregnancy does not appear to be associated with increased risk of congenital defects. This finding, however, is based off one study, with a small sample size (so it is recommended to avoid hydroquinone during pregnancy).


Safe

  • Vitamin C, Glycolic acid, and Lactic Acid: derived from fruit and milk sugars, considered nontoxic.

  • Hyaluronic Acid. This is a product your body naturally produces (which means its safe). Because of its molecular size, hyaluronic acid cannot penetrate the skin’s surface, and it is not systemically absorbed.


  • Benzoyl peroxide. Only 5% of topical benzoyl peroxide is absorbed through the skin. It is completely metabolized to benzoic acid within the skin and excreted.

Self-Tanners

Dihydroxyacetone is a color additive that is found in self-tanning products to produce an artificial tan. Color develops following topical application. These products contain dihydroxyacetone in concentrations ranging from 1% to 15%, and when applied topically, systemic levels are minimal (0.5%), and are considered safe to use.

Hair Removal and Bleaching Agents

  • Sodium, calcium, and potassium hydroxide, which are also found in depilatory creams, disassociate into sodium, calcium, potassium, and hydroxide ions, which are all present in the human body. Topical application of these products would not disrupt serum levels and would not be considered a problem for use during pregnancy.
  • Hydrogen peroxide. Hair-bleaching creams contain low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, making it unlikely to be systemically absorbed. In addition, should it be absorbed, hydrogen peroxide is rapidly metabolized. Therefore, use of these products during pregnancy is not expected to be a concern when done in moderation.
  • Laser has some controversy as to whether or not it’s safe; again, there isn’t a lot of information. Lasers do not penetrate very deep and there is not chemical exchange into the body. One interesting thought from me, (not speaking from personal experience) the body becomes more sensitive during pregnancy, and some laser treatments hurt to begin with. I’m not sure I’d want to get laser under those circumstances!

Botox and Fillers

The safety of Botox injections during pregnancy is unknown (Class C), and while I wouldn’t recommend intentionally getting Botox injections during pregnancy, many women receive injections prior to being pregnant or when they do not know they are pregnant, and have not had any problems. Botox Cosmetic has never traveled systemically, and works only on the muscles into which it has been injected. Therefore, one could presume it is safe to undergo this procedure. But I still don’t recommend it.  Unless you’re planning on having a “Toddler and Tiara” baby.  Then it’s ok.

 

xoxo,

not pregnant LK


Image Salicylic Flash Peel followed by Glycolic/Retinol Peel

2 Sep

‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!  Yes! My skin was starting to break out from some life stress and my lackadaisical summer fun on the Cape was coming to a close (i.e. I will be out of prolonged sun exposure). My typical home-care regimen includes retinol and a skin lightener, which allows me to peel without prepping, so I was ready for my first peel of the season! I needed it too!

Pre-Peel Protocol

Prepping Your Skin for a Peel is very important.  At least 30 days prior to your peel you should not tan or burn your skin. And tanning or burning your skin should be a habit you avoid, in general. Also, it is advised that you discontinue use of any retinoids, retinols, glycolics, or AHA’s at least 48-72 hours before your chemical peel or any resurfacing treatment.

Customizing My Peel

The treatment I received was an Image Salicylic Peel followed by an Image Glycolic/Retinol Peel. The Salicylic Peel is designed for patients with acne, oily, or acne prone skin (me!). Salicylic Acid works to slow down the sebaceous gland, thus slowing oil production that clogs the pores. The Glycolic Acid gently exfoliates the dead skin cells, which in turn increases cellular turnover. In this case, we are also using the Salicylic Acid to dissolve the dead skin cells on the surface of my skin to therefore also allow the Glycolic/Retinol peel to penetrate my epidermis more evenly and allow for deeper penetration of the preceding peel, and therefore softer, smoother skin.

Anyone who has mature, dry, sensitive skin can have a peel, but some modifications would need to be made.

Step 1: Cleanse

My skin was cleansed with the Image Ageless Total Facial Cleanser, which contains 12% Glycolic Acid. Glycolic Acid is excellent for exfoliating the skin, leaving it fresher and brighter looking! The Ageless Total Facial Cleanser has a great tingly feeling, so you KNOW it’s working! It is excellent for keeping pores clear and occasional breakouts to a minimum.



Step 2: I-PREP Degreasing Solution (Professional Only Product…btw)

The degreasing solution is applied with gauze to remove as much of the surface oils on the skin as possible. This will allow for the product to evenly and more effectively penetrate the different layers of the epidermis (that’s a fancy word for skin)!

Step 3: Salicylic Peel is Quickly Applied and Then Removed

(this technique is referred to as a “flash” peel)

It is important for a peel to penetrate the epidermis to have visible improvement in the condition of your skin.

The white spots on my face is called frosting. Achieving frosting is the goal with chemical peels. This is a reaction of the skin’s proteins with an acid in a low pH resulting in coagulation. The lower the pH, the more coagulation will result. The peel destroys the existing tissues in order for the body to heal and make new tissue.

Image Skincare’s chemical peels have a low pH (which means they are strong acids) and are therefore able to penetrate more deeply into the epidermis, and thus make more new tissues.


Step 4: Image Skincare Glycolic/Retinol I-Peel Applied and left on up to 5 minutes.

This peel from Image is in an Aloe Vera base, so this allows the peel to be massaged into the skin. The Image peels also contain other healing properties, besides aloe vera, like Vitamin C, skin lighteners, brighteners, antioxidants and peptides. So, the peels are actually healing your skin, as they peel it, giving you a healthier result, faster, because your skin is less traumatized by the peel!


Step 5: Peel is quickly removed with cool water.


This is what my skin looked like just after the peel was removed. You will notice my skin is a bit flushed or a little red, this is called erythema and is a normal, expected side effect from a peel. One of the amazing things that chemical peels do is stimulate blood flow and increase the rate of skin turnover, bringing newer cells to the surface more rapidly. This allows skin to begin to appear smoother, more hydrated, and more plump. Also, the increased blood flow brings more nutrients to the skin, therefore creating healthier skin!



Step 6: Ormedic Balancing Gel Masque


An ultra-gentle, organic cooling gel masque developed for compromised, inflamed or irritated skin. Organic Aloe Vera, Arnica Montana and licorice quickly help reduce redness and other signs of irritation while bringing sensitive skin into healthy balance. Also may used for highly reactive, rosacea or acneic skin types

Step 7: Vital C Hydrating Enzyme Masque


Gently exfoliates dead skin with enzymes and adds essential anti-oxidants and minerals to improve skin health.

After

This is what I looked like immediately after removing the masques, my skin is already less red and inflamed, and the healing and rejuvenating process has begun!

24 Hours Later
(no make-up)

The first 24 hours after having this peel your skin will feel tight and shedding may occur. The skin may appear darker, due to the exfoliation of dead skin cells that has melanin present. This will gently shed off.

Post-Peel Protocol

After this peel I used an Image Post Peel Kit, which contains the Ormedic Cleanser, Max Cream, Skin Balancing Serum, Ormedic Balancing Masque, and SPF. These products are used post peel because they are gentle, contain peptides needed to heal, melanocyte suppressants, and aloe for redness/irritation. It is especially important to use SPF and stay out of the sun post peel. Products containing retinol (only time I recommend NOT using retinol), glycolic acid, or alpha hydroxyl acid’s for about 5 days.

Thank you to Alexis Robertson, from Image Skin Care (www.Imageskincare.com). I am so lucky to have you in my life!

Xoxo, LK

***Guess what!!! I’m finally going under the knife and getting breast implants! You might think I don’t need it from my picture above, but I assure you… it’s all Victoria’s Secret! Of course, I’ll be blogging about my experience! My consult with Dr. Russo is Friday, Sept 7, so expect posts to start soon!



Everybody’s Doing It!

29 Jul

“My wife’s into that Botox Stuff” – weird guy on the cape trying to give me vodka. ????

Anyways, it seems like everybody’s into “that Botox stuff.” But no one will admit to it!!! What’s the deal people? I mean… I fully admit to being an addict. I love my Botox! I guess I’m a little on the young side (although my birthday is coming up July 31!! Yeah!). So who exactly is doing this “Botox stuff”? Here’s some excerpts from my business plan on the “consumer profile” (I wrote this in 2009, so… there is updated information… but… I haven’t updated my stuff. I HATE making graphs on the computer… but if you gave me some colored pens and a whiteboard I would be ALL over it!).

Consumers

A survey by the Aesthetic Cosmetic Surgery Education & Research Foundation (ASERF), 2009, found the typical patient “married, working mother between 41-55 years of age with a household income of under $100,000.” These women were also found to be “health-conscious,” exercising, and eating right. Nearly 7/10 of the responders regard Botox and dermal fillers as an important part of their aesthetic routine.

Smart, health-conscious women ahhhhh? That makes me happy.

Age Distribution

Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

12,000

371,501

1,256,608

734,751

182,098

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0

9,844

55,635

41,118

11,880

Hyaluronic Acid

3,919

168,629

604,262

420,069

116,159

I’m assuming any of these 18 and under year olds are using Botox for non-cosmetic use, or for correction of facial deformities. Or… they are on “Toddler’s and Tiara’s.”

Percentage totals of Number of Procedures Performed in 2009, according to the ASAPS:

Injectables:

18 and under

19-34

35-50

51-64

65+

Botulinum Toxin Type A

0.5%

14.5%

41.1%

36.2%

7.7%

Calcium hydroxylapatite

0%

8.3%

47.0%

34.7%

10.0%

Hyaluronic Acid

0.3%

12.8%

46.0%

32.0%

8.8%

Gender

In a recent survey by RealSelf.com, of the people who would get cosmetic work, the percentage of men is climbing. Ya, it’s true! Men are vain too! And not just gays! I was sitting in a bar eating by myself (yea… I was banished from my dinner party…) and I met a couple from New York. They were so much fun! The husband and the wife did botox… and they’ve been together for 12 years. And they still liked each other. And other people (like me) had a blast talking to them. …You know me and my tangents. Anyways. Good looking people are happy and stay married longer. I’m not sure if it’s true or not… I actually made that up. But men really are doing the “botox stuff”!

Would Get Cosmetic Work:

18-34

35-44

45-54

55+

Men

64%

67%

64%

47%

Women

82%

82%

80%

71%

From 2008-2009, minimally-invasive procedures increased 2% in the male market (ASPS, 5). And I assure you, it’s not just gay men doing this! I have a pretty large percentage (ok… I have a few) straight men doing this “Botox Stuff.”

                                Source ASPS, 2010 (8, 10)

Location:

The Northeast Region charges the highest amount in fees in the minimally invasive cosmetics procedures industries.

According to 2009 Regional Distribution Data by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, New England holds 20% of the Botox market and 31% (the largest) of the soft-tissue filler market.

Percent of Total Procedures Performed by Region

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5
Botulinum Toxin

20%

14% 23% 15% 28%
Calcium Hydroxylapatite 35% 16% 20% 15% 15%
Hyaluronic acid 31% 12% 18% 8% 31%

Source: ASPS 2010 (15)

The Northeast Region has the highest percentage of filler procedures performed (we are Region 1). Midwest is the yellow region 2. Region 3 is light blue. Region 4 is greenish. Five is purple. Interestingly, the Noretheast and West Coast are comparable in the procedures performed. I wonder how much L.A. and New York skew that though. And Miami probably skews region 3. Just saying. Statistics are only as good as their interpretation.

Income level

Data collected by the ASPS in “Demographic Changes among Plastic Surgery Patients” demonstrates that income no longer plays a significant role in elective procedures (1). With the adjunct on patient financing options, the numbers continue to increase.

According to an Allergan Representative, the average income level for a Botox Cosmetic patient is $50,000 nationally.

Social Class

Middle to Upper Class due to income level.

Education

Education level has not shown to be a significant factor in market; however the consumer of the Northeastern market wants to be educated on products/procedures before undergoing them.

Ethnicity:

                Source: ASPS 2009 Cosmetic and Reconstructive Demographics

Most Commonly Requested Minimally-Invasive Procedures for Ethnic Patients

African-American

Asian-American

Hispanic

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Injectable fillers

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Botulinum Toxin Type A

Source: ASPS 2010 (17)

Boston Market

And I’m not talking about chicken. Finding this information was pretty difficult, but I think I know my market pretty well. If you are under 35, you are probably not thinking about Botox or fillers… but honestly you should be. Remember, volume loss starts at 25. Being preventative is super important, and will cost less and look the most natural in the long run. At the very least, please use medical grade skin care!

If you’re over 35, it’s a good idea to start with the area that bothers you most. Have a long consult with your injector. Work out a schedule/plan with your provider, and make sure you talk about prices! That plan should ALWAYS start with good skin care!!!

I know your mom might disagree… but…

If Everybody’s Doing It, Shouldn’t You Be Too?


xoxo,

LK

Ahhhh… Big Ange is getting the “Botox Stuff.” LOVE IT! (Ok… well maybe she’s not the best ambassador of the Botox Nation. When do I get a t.v. show?)

Prepping Your Skin for a Peel

28 Jun

It’s not exactly the best time of year to be doing chemical peels (or laser treatments) because most people want to be outside enjoying the sun. But I’ve been doing a lot of training with Alexis Robertson, the Massachusetts rep for Image Skin Care, and I just finished reading a book she gave me on Chemical Peeling. So I had to post something before I gave her back her book! Stay tuned for more posts on different types of Peels or start researching with   ‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!.


ĂźAlexis is peeling Andrea Purcell, an excellent aesthetician in North Reading at Stephanie Cogliano on Main Street. Andrea is a candidate for a peel in the summer because she has prepped her skin, and she will not be in the sun. She is a trained professional.

Why Peel?

Chemical Peels are great ways to reduce fine lines and wrinkles, clear up acne, and fade hyperpigmentation. But before you have a peel there are a few things you should be using on your skin to prep it. This will ensure you get the best results from your peel. Ideally, these products should be started two to four weeks before a peel, depending on the state of your skin to start and the type of peel that you will be receiving.

Prepping is important for several reasons.

  • It will reduce wound healing time.
  • Allow for more uniform penetration of the peeling agent.
  • Decrease the risk of post inflammatory hyperpigmentation.
  • Enforce the concept of a maintenance regimen and determine which products your skin tolerates.
  • Establish compliance and eliminate inappropriate peel candidates.

So what products should you be using to prep your skin? Here’s a little guide.

Retinoic Acid

(ex. Retin A, Trenitoin) By now you should know how much I love retinol! The use of Retinoic Acid 2 weeks before a TCA peel will speed up re-epithelization of cells (which prevents infection). Since Retinoic Acid thins the top layer of dead skin cells (stratum corneum), it allows for better penetration of the peeling agent. Retinoic Acid has also been shown to have some skin lightening effects. It is also my FAVORITE skin care product.  More on Retinoic Acid (my fav!).

 

AHA’s

(ex. Glycolic acid) AHA products also thin the stratum corneum and allow better penetration of peeling agents. They also have been shown to have some skin lightening effects.

*My Favorite Product EVER is an AHA/RETINAL Blend:


MD Reconstructive Repair Crème. Hands down best product on the market.

Bleaching Agents

(ex. Hydroquinone, kojic acid) These products are not exactly bleaching your skin. They inhibit tyrosinase, an enzyme involved in the production of melanin, making hyperpigmentation reactions less likely. Personally, I love kojic acid, it smells like Mexico. No, not the dirty part… the part that smells like Piña Coladas. We will from now on refer to this product as the Cancun of skin care. Minus the hangover.

Currently, there is some controversy over the use of hydroquinone. It should not be used for long periods of time, or on pigmentation that is caused by hormones (also known as melasma). Be careful with this ingredient. It’s used in a lot of medical product lines (like Obagi… which I’m not a fan of).

Sunblock

Get used to it. SPF BABY! Remember stick to physical blocks with Zinc.  It’s Sunny Out! (A Post in Honor of Sun Block).

So why is it important to establish a baseline?

By starting on products prior to peeling, a baseline can be established as to what your skin normally tolerates when it’s not inflamed or irritated. Also it establishes some good habits, like the need to wear sunscreen. If you go in for a peel, and you don’t wear sunscreen, you are going to be in some serious trouble. The same goes with using Retinol products. But, it all honesty, we sometimes ignore home care instructions because we don’t understand why we are being told we need to do something. We need a consequence before we follow a rule. Well… I forgot sunscreen one time while using retinol. I won’t do that again. Caused my own little chemical peel. Not pretty.

Noncompliance is a HUGE problem in health care. And chemical peels can be dangerous if you’re not going to listen to post care instructions. If you can’t follow a few instructions before a peel, you certainly aren’t going to follow them after. This just proves to you and your skin person that you are not an eligible candidate for a peel. But if you CAN follow instructions, it gets you into a good regiment which you will need to continue post peel. Remember, your skin cells are constantly cycling, and therefore it is extremely important to ALWAYS be taking care of them.

This is not a one and done procedure (like liposuction is… lol.).

“Youth No Longer Wasted On the Young”


Love LK.

P.S. I am sticking to being brunette. But I’m keeping my twitter name as @Boston_Barbie. I will forever be a blonde (and a child) at heart. You can follow me and Alexis at @ImageSkinCareMA.

Hydra-facials are awesome.

19 May

(after picture)

Because I’m pretty and I say so. And in case that’s not enough of a reason… read on. J

A Little Latin Lesson in Linguistics (alliteration is as awesome as hydrafacials)

In case you’re a little rusty on your Latin, “hydra” means water and facial means … well facial isn’t Latin for anything. That I know of… but I’m not a linguist. Anyways. Hydrafacials are amazing! They work by infusing serums into your pores. Hydrafacial, or hydradermabrasion, is a noninvasive, non-laser skin resurfacing treatment that combines cleansing, exfoliation, extraction, hydration and antioxidant protection simultaneously, resulting in clearer, more beautiful skin. There is no discomfort or down-time (although you might have a little redness for about an hour). The treatment is soothing, moisturizing, non-invasive and non-irritating. It also has attachments that can be used on the back, neck, and dĂ©colletĂ© (that’s actually a French word… not Latin).

The HydraFacial treatment improves the appearance of:

  • fine lines and wrinkles
  • congested and enlarged pores
  • oily or acne-prone skin
  • hyper-pigmentation and brown spots

Before starting, I washed all of my make up off (which I don’t wear much of because my skin is usually so nice!). This is my before picture. I was in DESPERATE need of a facial.

Pass 1: Activ-4™ Skin Solution

Designed for most skin types. It helps to promote the overall health of skin; improve the appearance of hyperpigmentation, brown spots, fine lines and uneven skin tone. The tip attachment used on the hand-piece during this step has a fine sandpaper-like part works like microdermabrasion. It mechanically exfoliates the top layer of skin.

My face is RED.

The black part is the microdermabrasion tip.

Step 2: Beta-HD™ Skin Solution

This Salicylic Acid based skin solution is specifically designed for acne-prone and oily skin (like mine). It softens sebum, dislodges skin debris and aids in painless extractions of whiteheads and blackheads.

Step 3
Antiox-6™ Skin Solution:

Containing Vitamin A, Vitamin E, White Tea Extract and Hyaluronic Acid, the Antiox-6™ is designed for overall antioxdiant protection and deep hydration on most skin types.

Other Steps

  • DermaBuilder™ Peptide Complex (
    DermaBuilder™): THE new, hot age-refining solution right now! The DermaBuilder™ helps to improve the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, skin firmness, skin tone and skin texture.
  • GlySal™ Acid Peels ( GlySal): This special Glycolic Acid & Salicylic Acid blend combines physical & chemical peeling to achieve optimal results. Unlike traditional acid peels, there is little to no downtime involved. Skin is well hydrated, smooth and radiant after the procedure.

1 hour later …

In the CAAAAAH Leaving JAHHHHR. Boston. Haaaaaa.

Representing my team. I love Rondo! #9 : My man.

Very happy my skin looks so good. Now if we could just fix my skunk hair. Just kidding. I love my Ombre (hombre? I think that’s Latin?). As you can see I’m still a little pink, but my skin looks and feels so fresh and so clean.

Recommendations

Visible skin refinement and an even, radiant skin tone may be seen after just one treatment. The smooth results and hydration may last 5 to 7 days or even longer.  A series of 6 treatments is recommended for improving the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, hyper-pigmentation, acne and oily skin. Remember, using good skin care products at home will help these results last longest and help give you the most bang for your buck (did I just say that?) for any in office procedure. (Step 2: Spend wisely.)

I even got Alexis to love them (the Image Rep slash Skin Guru). And she is so picky about her skin. See. She’s smiling.

Fake It Until You Make It

25 Apr

“Time goes by so slowly for those who wait
No time to hesitate
Those who run seem to have all the fun
I’m caught up
I don’t know what to do”

  1. Who doesn’t love Madonna?
  2. I found a font called “crazy girl blonde.” I didn’t know I had my own font!
  3. Tangent. Anyways. I realized I’m at 6 months of blogging. Longer than any relationships I’ve been in for the past 5 years. Eh. I love myself and that’s what matters right? Well, whether you think I’m a narcissist or not is up to you (did I mention I’m a Leo?); but I think it’s important to take a second to appreciate reaching milestones.

So here goes. In the last six months of blogging I have:

  • Written almost 70 posts about skin care, beauty, and health.
  • Reached 10,000 people with what I have to say (or at the very least looking at my pictures).
    • Which on a sub-bullet leads me to the fact that I’ve learned how to make my pictures pretty fancy and interesting looking. Case in point. Above I put my picture into “perspective.” It makes me look so thin. And black and white – always classy. J
  • Connected with readers in 95 different countries. (I am SO impressed by this! Wow!).
  • Sparked several Facebook controversies over things I’ve done in order to have something interesting to write about. Mainly… things I’ve done to my face.
  • Basically saved the world. Oh wait… that’s my one year goal of the blog. Ha.

It really is a lot of work to write a post. Some take me over four hours (between researching what I’m writing and taking pictures—always trying to be interesting and original—and most important—trying to convey my voice and personality through written text). So I’d like to take the time here to thank all my readers and everyone who has given suggestions (positive and negative!). So thanks everyone! I think if this was an award show I’d be cut off now.

I guess when you stop to actually think about the things you’ve achieved be they work goals, life goals, or even aesthetic goals, you can actually be surprised by how much you’ve accomplished. I know personally I spend so much time trying to complete the next step that I get frustrated with things not moving as fast as I want them to, and it can be really discouraging. My lawyer, Richard, reminded me how far I’ve come in business over the past two years, and I hadn’t really taken the time to think about it. So I’m taking the time to remind you. The longest journey beings with a single step. Keep moving forward in the direction of your dreams. (Insert other clichĂ© phrase here). You can get pretty far in six months! Does my Madonna quote kindda go?




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