Tag Archives: spa

Image Salicylic Flash Peel followed by Glycolic/Retinol Peel

2 Sep

‘Tis the Season for Chemical Peels!  Yes! My skin was starting to break out from some life stress and my lackadaisical summer fun on the Cape was coming to a close (i.e. I will be out of prolonged sun exposure). My typical home-care regimen includes retinol and a skin lightener, which allows me to peel without prepping, so I was ready for my first peel of the season! I needed it too!

Pre-Peel Protocol

Prepping Your Skin for a Peel is very important.  At least 30 days prior to your peel you should not tan or burn your skin. And tanning or burning your skin should be a habit you avoid, in general. Also, it is advised that you discontinue use of any retinoids, retinols, glycolics, or AHA’s at least 48-72 hours before your chemical peel or any resurfacing treatment.

Customizing My Peel

The treatment I received was an Image Salicylic Peel followed by an Image Glycolic/Retinol Peel. The Salicylic Peel is designed for patients with acne, oily, or acne prone skin (me!). Salicylic Acid works to slow down the sebaceous gland, thus slowing oil production that clogs the pores. The Glycolic Acid gently exfoliates the dead skin cells, which in turn increases cellular turnover. In this case, we are also using the Salicylic Acid to dissolve the dead skin cells on the surface of my skin to therefore also allow the Glycolic/Retinol peel to penetrate my epidermis more evenly and allow for deeper penetration of the preceding peel, and therefore softer, smoother skin.

Anyone who has mature, dry, sensitive skin can have a peel, but some modifications would need to be made.

Step 1: Cleanse

My skin was cleansed with the Image Ageless Total Facial Cleanser, which contains 12% Glycolic Acid. Glycolic Acid is excellent for exfoliating the skin, leaving it fresher and brighter looking! The Ageless Total Facial Cleanser has a great tingly feeling, so you KNOW it’s working! It is excellent for keeping pores clear and occasional breakouts to a minimum.



Step 2: I-PREP Degreasing Solution (Professional Only Product…btw)

The degreasing solution is applied with gauze to remove as much of the surface oils on the skin as possible. This will allow for the product to evenly and more effectively penetrate the different layers of the epidermis (that’s a fancy word for skin)!

Step 3: Salicylic Peel is Quickly Applied and Then Removed

(this technique is referred to as a “flash” peel)

It is important for a peel to penetrate the epidermis to have visible improvement in the condition of your skin.

The white spots on my face is called frosting. Achieving frosting is the goal with chemical peels. This is a reaction of the skin’s proteins with an acid in a low pH resulting in coagulation. The lower the pH, the more coagulation will result. The peel destroys the existing tissues in order for the body to heal and make new tissue.

Image Skincare’s chemical peels have a low pH (which means they are strong acids) and are therefore able to penetrate more deeply into the epidermis, and thus make more new tissues.


Step 4: Image Skincare Glycolic/Retinol I-Peel Applied and left on up to 5 minutes.

This peel from Image is in an Aloe Vera base, so this allows the peel to be massaged into the skin. The Image peels also contain other healing properties, besides aloe vera, like Vitamin C, skin lighteners, brighteners, antioxidants and peptides. So, the peels are actually healing your skin, as they peel it, giving you a healthier result, faster, because your skin is less traumatized by the peel!


Step 5: Peel is quickly removed with cool water.


This is what my skin looked like just after the peel was removed. You will notice my skin is a bit flushed or a little red, this is called erythema and is a normal, expected side effect from a peel. One of the amazing things that chemical peels do is stimulate blood flow and increase the rate of skin turnover, bringing newer cells to the surface more rapidly. This allows skin to begin to appear smoother, more hydrated, and more plump. Also, the increased blood flow brings more nutrients to the skin, therefore creating healthier skin!



Step 6: Ormedic Balancing Gel Masque


An ultra-gentle, organic cooling gel masque developed for compromised, inflamed or irritated skin. Organic Aloe Vera, Arnica Montana and licorice quickly help reduce redness and other signs of irritation while bringing sensitive skin into healthy balance. Also may used for highly reactive, rosacea or acneic skin types

Step 7: Vital C Hydrating Enzyme Masque


Gently exfoliates dead skin with enzymes and adds essential anti-oxidants and minerals to improve skin health.

After

This is what I looked like immediately after removing the masques, my skin is already less red and inflamed, and the healing and rejuvenating process has begun!

24 Hours Later
(no make-up)

The first 24 hours after having this peel your skin will feel tight and shedding may occur. The skin may appear darker, due to the exfoliation of dead skin cells that has melanin present. This will gently shed off.

Post-Peel Protocol

After this peel I used an Image Post Peel Kit, which contains the Ormedic Cleanser, Max Cream, Skin Balancing Serum, Ormedic Balancing Masque, and SPF. These products are used post peel because they are gentle, contain peptides needed to heal, melanocyte suppressants, and aloe for redness/irritation. It is especially important to use SPF and stay out of the sun post peel. Products containing retinol (only time I recommend NOT using retinol), glycolic acid, or alpha hydroxyl acid’s for about 5 days.

Xoxo, LK

***Guess what!!! I’m finally going under the knife and getting breast implants! You might think I don’t need it from my picture above, but I assure you… it’s all Victoria’s Secret! Of course, I’ll be blogging about my experience!


Advertisements

Great Gifts for the Women in Your Life

7 Dec
Having a hard time finding the perfect gift?  Here’s a few things every female fancies (you can’t go wrong)! 
 
Gift Certificates For:
  • a manicure/pedicure ($15-$50)
  • a facial ($45-$150)
  • Her Favorite Hair Salon (be sure not to get just ANY salon)
  • a massage ($60-$100)
  • a day at the Spa
  • A nice robe/winter gloves/hat/scarf.  We all wear them… we can always use a new one.

A Little More Thoughtful:

  • A New Flat Iron (some good names: GHD, CHI, and BaByliss) ($150-$350)
  • Magnetic nail polish (from Nails Inc.)
  • Good Shampoo (like Matrix $13-$22/bottle)
  • a subscription to New Beauty Magazine (www.newbeauty.com) LOVE IT! $9.99/issue
  • NARS Turkish Delight Lip Gloss–looks good on literally everyone (Sephora $22)
  • Along the lines of Sephora (which is at every mall) there are some really cool, easy gifts in there.  My friend Allegra told me she wants some vibrating lip gloss (I have no idea WHY it vibrates)… and they have sample kits of things like “mascara’s” and “lip glosses.”
  • New Make-up Brushes (check out Sephora again)
  • Jewelry- but beware– jewelry is a very personalized gift.  Diamonds and pearls are always classy… but is she a diamond girl?  bling bling? or more subtle? like classy pearls?  Does she usually wear gold? or silver?  I once broke up with a guy who bought me aquamarines for an anniversary gift (not because I’m shallow, but because after dating someone for a year, you should know what kind of jewelry that person wears.  I realized it was a dead end relationship.)
  • Lululemon.  For your sporty chick.  (Has anyone seen the commercial where the chick is talking all about why she wears yoga clothes–she bikes, she does yoga, she hits the gym– and then she says “Who am I kidding, I wear Yoga pants because I’m lazy” ahahaha)

Just So You Know…

Bags–A crash course

  • Dooney and Bourke (otherwise known as D&B) $$
  • Coach $$$
  • Chanel/Gucci/Burberry/Louis Vuitton $$$$$$$$$

Don’t even think about buying her shoes. — however the book “100 Shoes: the Costume Institute/the Metropolitan Museum of Art” with intro by Sarah Jessica Parker… that’s a great gift!

100 Shoes: The Costume Institute / The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Ask a Chick!

My friend Megan swears by “asking Steph at Nordstrom’s in Natick;” all you need is a size and she can style you up (remember to check the tag of your girls clothes… and also keep in mind every brand is different, confusing and annoying–yea we know!).  If you can’t make it to Natick, that’s ok.  A lot of the high end stores have staff that are MORE than helpful.  I know you don’t like to ask for directions… but the perfect gift can gift is the gift that keeps on giving… when the kids are sleeping.  Just never NEVER mention that the chick at the desk was cute.  In any way. Ever.

Wrap It Up. 

Gifts should come in an exciting box.  You’ve heard this saying before.  Wrap it up.  In something nice.

Anatomy of a Facial

3 Dec

A facial is a procedure involving a variety of skin treatments, including: steam, exfoliation, extraction, creams, lotions, facial masks, peels, and massage.  Facials can last anywhere from 30 minutes to over an hour and range in price depending on the types of products used for the treatments.  They are professionally recommended every 4 weeks for maximum results. Step 1: See a Professional.

All facials follow the same basic structure and order. They will begin with makeup removal and cleansing.  Then comes some method of exfoliation to remove dead skin cells and smooth the surface of the skin. A massage is then performed that can include all or some of the scalp, face, neck, shoulders, back and even the hands or feet.

Facials are then classified in two ways:  hands on treatment or electrotherapy.

“Hands-on” Treatment

The aesthetician will use her hands to perform the facial treatment. Sometimes, a steam machine is incorporated in these facials during or after cleansing, to open up the pores and allow a deeper cleansing action.

A facial mask is a creamy paste (or gel) that often contains minerals, vitamins, essential oils, and fruit extracts is the main step in the hands on treatment.  There are different kinds of masks for different purposes: deep-cleansing, by penetrating the pores; healing acne scars or hyper-pigmentation; brightening, for a gradual illumination of the skin tone.

Gels are mostly used for oily and acne prone skins and oils or moisturizing creams are used for dry to normal and matured skin types.  A clay or mud based face pack is used after the cleansing process and steam process (optional) is over to close the open pores and to provide nutrition to the skin.

Masks are removed by either rinsing the face with water, wiping if off with a damp cloth, or peeling off of the face by hand.  Duration for wearing a mask varies.  The perceived effects of a facial mask treatment include revitalizing, healing, or refreshing; and, may yield temporary or long-term benefits.

Electorotherapy Facials

Use machines as part of the treatment; there are several different types, which are suited to different skin types. Some of the most popular variations of this type of facial are:

  • Galvanic treatments: metal rollers or applicators are used to either produce a deep cleansing effect.  Depending on the active product being used, this will help reduce spots and blemishes (making this a good facial for an oily skin type), or to help infuse active ingredients deeper in to the skin (for a variety of skin types).
  • High frequency treatments: uses a glass electrode passed over gauze placed on the skin. This helps dry out spots and has an antibacterial effect, so is good for oilier skins or those with a few specific blemishes.  An indirect high frequency facial uses a saturator held by the client to draw a moisturizing massage medium deeper in to the skin, and so is best suited for more mature or dry skin types.
  • Microcurrent treatments: also known as non-surgical face lift, this type of facial uses a current to lift and tone the facial muscles and also to improve the colour and texture of the skin and soften lines.

During most of the electrotherapy treatments you may experience a slight tingling effect on the skin, but this is quite normal.

Facials are key to having nice skin!  They need to be maintained with a home care regiment that is not OTC!

Check out these posts as well:

Evaluating Your Skin.

 

Step 2: Spend wisely.

That’s NOT Botox.

18 Nov
Another strong misunderstanding a lot of people have around the Boston Area is what products go where Botox does not.   If it’s caused by gravity:  THAT’S NOT BOTOX!

HYALURONIC ACID (HA) FILLERS (TEMPORARY)

Hyaluronic acid fillers are synthetic sugars that attract water molecules.  They are placed in actual wrinkles or other areas that need volume and offer instant results. They fill in marionette lines, lift up jowls or plump up volume along the jaw line where definition has been lost.

Restylane, Perlane and Juvéderm (www.juvederm.com) are the most commonly used hyaluronic acid fillers, with Juvéderm being the leading product (I refer to Restylane as ‘old school’).  There is no need for allergy testing, as these products are sugars your body naturally makes.  There is little pain with injection, as the new products come with lidocaine added as a powder to the product.   Expect a topical numbing agent (topical lidocaine) to be applied prior to injection.  This should be left on for AT LEAST 20 minutes.  The actual procedure only takes about 15 minutes.  Swelling and bruising are possible and you should probably not do a filler if you have an important event within a week from treatment.  ICE ICE ICE!  I also recommend arnica montana cream which can be purchased at GNC or Whole Foods.  You can expect results to last from six months to a year, depending on the brand and where it is placed (Juvéderm lasts the longest).

I have Juvéderm filler in my lips.  It feels and looks natural.  It was the first injectable I tried, and I’m very happy with it.  😉  I mostly just use HA’s in the lips and very deep frown lines between the brows.  Reason being, HA’s are injected into the superficial dermis and do not give as good of a fill for the cost for deep lines and folds.  I like other products more for those very deep lines.

Calcium Hydroxylapitate (SEMI-PERMANENT)

Radiesse (www.radiesse.com) is an example of a semi-permanent filler and it is made from calcium molecules suspended in a gel which stimulates your collagen. The microspheres in it create “scaffolding” that your own collagen will grow around, but is eventually broken down by the body. Radiesse can be used to fill the nasolabial folds and marionette lines, as well as define the contours of the face.  It goes deep in the dermal layer of skin, and should NEVER go in the lips!

Lidocaine topical should be applied 20 minutes prior to injection.  Lidocaine is added to the product immediately prior to injection.

I recently had a little lift put in my cheeks (as described in a prior blog).  I had zero pain or discomfort.  The lidocaine eventually traveled down my nerve from my cheek to my lips.  It felt a little funny!  It looks and feels completely natural. 

COLLAGEN STIMULATORS (aka collagen builders or stimulating fillers)

Collagen stimulators contain particles that signal the skin to produce more collagen. Instead of just filling in select lines and wrinkles, these are used on larger areas like the cheeks.  They can be used in areas where synthetic fillers look somewhat unnatural (like the lower face under the cheek area).  Results are not immediate; it takes about 6 weeks to see the result of the collagen stimulation; however, the product lasts two years.  Most women prefer the gradual change in their facial contour.

Sculptra (www.sculptraaesthetic.com) is an example of a collagen stimulator. It is approved by the FDA for restoration and/or correction of the signs of facial fat loss (lipoatrophy) in people with human immunodeficiency virus (as is Radiesse). Most patients require an average of two to three treatments six weeks apart for optimal results.

I had Sculptra injected into my temples.  Zero pain.  My patients are in LOVE with this product.  It costs about as much as other fillers when you take into consideration how long it lasts.  It also looks COMPLETELY natural due to the fact it’s ALL your own collagen produced.  I foresee this product being my number one injectable within the next year!  Move over Botox!!! 

COLLAGEN FILLERS

Although collagen fillers changed the face of beauty when they entered the marketplace in the 1980s, they quickly fell out of favor when longer-lasting hyaluronic acid was introduced. However, many doctors still use collagen, especially for plumping the lips and filling in “smoker’s lines” around the mouth.  Although overfilling is necessary to achieve the desired result, the excess fluid is absorbed over the first few hours after treatment, and minor redness and swelling subside in a few days.  Results last from two to three months… also known as a waste of money when there are so many better products!

How to Tip Your Beauty Provider

1 Nov

In their younger years, my mother was a waitress and my father was a bartender.  They taught me you always tip 20% unless the service is really bad.  People who work in the service industry depend on their tips as a large portion of their income.  Waitress’s make like $2 an hour.  You can’t live off that!

Hairdresser’s and aesthetician’s have a similar sentiment.  How should they be tipped?  Here’s a guide!

Hair Stylist  15%-20% of your service.  If you have a hard time figuring this out, and for some reason you left your cell at home, think of it like this.  20% is $2 on every $10.  So if it’s $100 you should tip about $20. 

Aesthetician 15%-20% of your service.

Shampoo Girl  $2

Manicurist $2-$5

Massage 15-20%

Valet $2

Waxing $2-$10 Eyebrows think $2, Back… think $10 (…and then think about laser or electrology!)

Electrologist:  Tipping this person is a toss up, because you do see them very often. 

Laser Person:  Does not require to be tipped.  This is a more medical service and is usually treated as a Medical Personnel.  If you buy a package and you do feel you need to tip, divide the price you paid by the number of treatment sessions you are receiving and tip 15-20% off of that (usually about $20). 

Business Owner (who provides your service): It is a long standing idea that you don’t need to tip the owner of a place if they provide you your beauty service.  It is in my opinion that we need to abolish this rule.  As a small business owner, I can tell you, cash flow is difficult.  Banks aren’t lending money to anyone, making it harder on small business.  Tip them.  They work harder than you know!

Medical Personnel  You do not need to tip the person who does your Botox!  As a nurse injector, I never accept tips.  You wouldn’t tip the doctor!

A Free Service 20% of what the service would have cost.  If you by some chance won a free service, say in a raffle, you should still tip the person!

 

Step 1: See a Professional

29 Sep


It’s easy to think you know how to take care of your skin, the media bombards women with “product knowledge.”  Healthcare is never cut in dry (fact for all you medline readers).  Without education and experience in a subject, we have no business self-diagnosing and dictating a plan of action.  It’s finding the right man for the right job.

Like in most aspects of healthcare, preventative care is not usually the route we choose.  Ever notice how European women have beautiful skin?  Part of the reason is because they see aestheticians.  Often.

Your skin is an organ; in fact, it’s the largest organ of your body.  It provides your body with:

  • Protection:  against pathogens
  •  Regulation: your body temperature
  • Controls evaporation:  moisture loss
  • Sensation: contains nerve endings for sensory
  •  Storage: for lipids and water
  • Absorption:  diffuses O2 and CO2
  • Resistance: acts as a water barrier

Case in point:  your skin has many vital roles physiologically.

Everyone’s skin is different, and there is no formula for “dry” or “oily.”  These characteristics are side effects of your physiology.  They are not going to go away unless you approach them at the dermal level.  A good aesthetician can explain to you your underlying physiology.  She can answer questions with medical information and explain what type of products you should be using.  (FYI: the title medical aesthetician doesn’t mean they’re good).

The path to maintaining flawless skin starts with an aesthetician.  It is an investment that will bring you decades of happiness.  You can trade in for a new car at any time, you can’t buy a new face (yet).

(P.S. a dermatologist is not an aesthetician).

%d bloggers like this: